A Book of Gems Choice selections from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 147

august message at his command, should it
not be the delight of those redeemed by his blood, to do his will, that
they enter by the gates into the city, and have a right to the tree of
life?

Who can, who dare slumber in his presence? Who dare be indifferent to
the theme that dwelt upon his gracious lips? When he speaks it is the
voice of a king—more, it is the voice of the King of kings and Lord of
lords; it is the voice of him who is to bear all rule, all authority
and power, until all his enemies are subdued. Heaven is his throne
and the earth his footstool. Shall we not adore his name, that he has
graciously promised to confess us before his Father and before his
angels? To his name be honor and dominion forever and ever.




JUDGMENT, THE GROUND OF REPENTANCE.


When Paul stood in the midst of Mar’s hill, he boldly declared the
ignorance and superstition of the Athenians, before the gospel, and
stated to them, that “in the times of this ignorance, God winked at,”
or that he did not hold them to a strict account. He concedes, here,
the principle expressed by the Savior, that where there is but little
given there is but little required; and on this ground, admits that
God would not deal with them strictly according to their works. But
he approaches a different state of things. A change was about to take
place in the dealings of God with that people. How is it to be now?
The apostle responds, “But now he commandeth all men everywhere to
repent.” In the times of the ignorance before the gospel, this command
to all men every where, to repent, did not exist. But, now that the
gospel is preached to every creature, he commands all men everywhere to
repent. But he does not stop here, but proceeds to give us the reason
why God commands men to repent. That reason is not, that there is no
day of judgment to come, which might serve as a reason why men need not
repent. Why, then, does God now command all men everywhere to repent?
The apostle answers, “Because he hath appointed a day, in which he will
judge the world in righteousness by that man whom he hath ordained.” It
is not strange, with this passage before us, that preaching Universalism
never causes anybody to repent. The preachers of that doctrine deny
the cause of repentance; and while the Lord calls upon men to repent,
because he hath appointed a day

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Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

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It is certainly better calculated to convey a general idea of the subject, than any attempt of the kind which has yet fallen under our observation.
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coloured 1 6 Portraits of Curious Characters in London, &c.
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' They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and, gathering round him, he proceeded as follows: 'Friends,' says he, 'the taxes are indeed very heavy; and, if those laid on by the government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us.
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on diseases, absolutely shortens life.
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.
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] [Illustration: Published by W.
Page 6
You expect they will be sold cheap, and, perhaps, they may for less than they cost; but, if you have no occasion for them, they must be dear to you.
Page 7
" When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece; but Poor Dick says, "It is easier to suppress the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 8
" The day comes round before you are aware, and the demand is made before you are prepared to satisfy it; or, if you bear your debt in mind, the term, which at first seemed so long, will, as it lessens, appear extremely short: "Time will seem to have added wings to his heels as well as his shoulders.
Page 9
The frequent mention he made of me must have tired any one else; but my vanity was wonderfully delighted with it, though I was conscious that not a tenth part of the wisdom was my own, which he ascribed to me; but rather the gleanings that I had made of the sense of all ages and nations.