A Book of Gems Choice selections from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 168

imposed on the credulity of mankind. Yet
the very mention of these dignitaries is lacking in all the writings of
several of the early centuries, either in the Bible or out of it. There
is not a trace of them in any writing of the period of which we speak,
Jewish, Christian, Infidel or Pagan. There is nothing clearer than that
the Papal religion came up too late to have the least claim to be the
true religion. The same is true of the Mohammedan religion. The true
religion was in the world long centuries before Mohammedanism had an
existence. It was born too late to be the true religion.

The true religion was born in Jerusalem. The Papacy was born in
Rome. Rome has been its seat—its Eternal City. It did not begin in
Jerusalem, but in Rome. Mohammedanism was not born in Jerusalem, but in
Mecca. It did not originate with Jesus but with Mohammed. A religion
not known till hundreds of years after Christ and his apostles, most
unequivocally is not the true religion. We need not trouble the reader
with the mention of any religion, born at a later date, in another
place, or originating with another person. Such a religion certainly
has no claim to be the true one. The true religion originated with
Jesus, in Jerusalem, and in the time of Christ and the apostles. Any
religion that did not originate with Jesus, in Jerusalem, and in the
time of Christ and the apostles, and that does not appear in the
accounts found on the pages of the New Testament, nor any writings of
the first three centuries, is out of the question. If the very name of
any religion, the person with whom it originated, and other important
matters connected with it, are not found in the Bible, nor a trace of
it in history for hundreds of years after Christ, it is out of the
question.

Is there any way to determine what the true religion is? Is it anywhere
distinctly set forth, revealed and embodied in writing, so that we can
find it separate from everything else? It is distinctly set forth by
Christ and his apostles, separate from everything else. They revealed
it as complete religion in itself, containing all things necessary to
life and godliness—the final the last will of God to man. It is the
culmination, the embodiment and consummation of infinite wisdom and
goodness in one religion, for all nations of men that dwell on all
the face of the earth. Can we find it? Can we tell what it is? Can

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Text Comparison with Experiments and Observations on Electricity Made at Philadelphia in America

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[Illustration] LETTER I.
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4.
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5.
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When _minus_ (or when in the common state) it will attract them, but stronger when _minus_ than when in the common state, the difference being greater.
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To prove that the electrical fire is _drawn off_ by the point, if you take the blade of the bodkin out of the wooden handle, and fix it in a stick of sealing wax, and then present it at the distance aforesaid, or if you bring it very near, no such effect follows; but sliding one finger along the wax till you touch the blade, and the ball flies to the shot immediately.
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S.
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4.
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If the particles of water bring with them portions of _both sorts_ of fire, the repulsions of the particles of air is still more strengthened and increased, and the triangles farther enlarged.
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e.
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20.
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I say, if these things are so, may not the knowledge of this power of points be of use to mankind, in preserving houses, churches, ships, &c.
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When the upper plate is electrified, the leaf is attracted and raised towards it, and would fly to that plate were it not for its own points.
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And if you hold a plate under it at six or eight inches distance, and cease turning the Globe, when the electrical atmosphere of the conductor grows small, it will descend to the plate and swim back again several times with the same fish-like motion, greatly to the entertainment of spectators.
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And yet the bottle by this means is charged![9] And therefore the fire that thus leaves.
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[Illustration] 33.
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Every electrician knows that a globe wet within will afford little or no fire, but the reason has not before been attempted to be given, that I know of.
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If you offer a quantity to one end of a long rod of metal, it receives it, and when it enters, every particle that was before in the rod, pushes its neighbour quite to the further end, where the overplus is discharg'd; and this instantaneously where the rod is part of the circle in the experiment of the shock.
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Now the globe being turn'd, could draw no fire from the floor through the machine, the communication that way being cut off by the thick glass plate under the cushion: it must then draw it through the chains whose ends were dipt in the oil of turpentine.
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For if it was fine enough to come with the electrical fluid through the body of one person, why should it stop on the skin of another? But I shall never have done, if I tell you all my conjectures, thoughts, and imaginations, on the nature and operations of this electrical fluid, and relate the variety of little experiments we have try'd.
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_Outside_: add, such moisture continuing up to the cork or wire.