A Book of Gems Choice selections from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 216

a church, or for a church, but his
work is at large, to build up the churches, strengthen them and turn
sinners to the Lord. He should introduce the gospel into new places,
establish churches, and in due time set them in order. He is not an
ecclesiastic, an official dignitary, who has much to say about his
_office_ and _authority_, but a _gospel man_, a man of influence, and
can command respect and do a good work.

A shepherd, or, which is the same, _pastor_, is not an officer at all,
but a figurative term applied to him who takes care of the flock. The
flock means the church, and the shepherd is the correlative of flock,
and is applied to an overseer, or one who oversees or looks over the
flock as a shepherd. “Pastoral work” is, then, the work of a shepherd,
or overseer, who can not be a novice or a young convert.

The work of the evangelist is now needed as much as ever, and the
evangelist is by no means done away. So the shepherds to take care
of the flock are now needed as much as ever, and the teachers are in
demand as much as ever. These are not now raised up and qualified by
miracle, but by ordinary means; nor is the work gone that they are
severally to do. The evangelizing is now needed as much as ever; so is
taking care of the churches and teaching the disciples all things that
Jesus commanded. True, as our brother has said, there is no office in
the church except overseer and deacon. The office of an evangelist is
not a church office.

We have a glorious army of young men now called into the field, capable
of one of the noblest works ever done by men. They have it in their
hearts to do that work; but if they are perverted they will be ruined
and will never accomplish the work to which they have given themselves.
They must not, on the one hand, be discouraged and disheartened, but
encouraged and their way opened; and, on the other hand, they must not
be arrogant, conceited and vain, but humble, gentle, and kind; examples
of piety, purity and moral excellence. They must not think to leap into
authority by virtue of being preachers, but, by faithful labor and
noble deeds, win their way and gain an influence among the people of
God. If, now and then, one of them is puffed up, filled with conceit
and arrogance, the same is true of other classes of men,

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Text Comparison with Benjamin Franklin and the First Balloons

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In.
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[3] [1] The Writings of Benjamin Franklin, collected and edited by Albert Henry Smyth, Volume IX, New York, 1906.
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It is suppos'd to have burst by the Elasticity of the contain'd Air when no longer compress'd by so heavy an Atmosphere.
Page 3
He was complimented on his Zeal and Courage for the Promotion of Science, but advis'd to wait till the management of these Balls was made by Experience more certain & safe.
Page 4
The Basket contained a sheep, a duck, and a Cock, who, except the Cock, received no hurt by the fall.
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Most is expected from the new one undertaken upon subscription by Messieurs Charles and Robert, who are Men of Science and mechanic Dexterity.
Page 6
They say they had a charming View of Paris & its Environs, the Course of the River, &c but that they were once lost, not knowing what Part they were over, till they saw the Dome of the Invalids, which rectified their Ideas.
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conveying Intelligence into, or out of a besieged Town, giving Signals to distant Places, or the like.
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I wish I could see the same Emulation between the two Nations as I see between the two Parties here.
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(THE SECOND AERIAL VOYAGE BY MAN.
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I am the more anxious for the Event, because I am not well inform'd of the Means provided for letting themselves gently down, and the Loss of these very ingenious Men would not only be a Discouragement to the Progress of the Art, but be a sensible Loss to Science and Society.
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B.
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Il a ete ramasse par des Enfans et vendu 6_d.
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_ Smyth states that he reproduced this letter from my press-copy but he omits the capital letters and the contractions in spelling, as well as the references "A" and "B," which are given by Bigelow with the remark that the drawings were not found.
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2d" corrected to "Sept.