A Book of Gems Choice selections from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 291

we sin wilfully after that we have
received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice
for sins, but a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery
indignation, which shall devour the adversaries.” Can men of sense
believe that a man for whom “there remaineth no more sacrifice for
sins,” but for whom their remains “a certain fearful looking for of
judgment and fiery indignation which shall devour the adversaries,”
will be saved?

8. John v. 29, the Lord declares that “they who have done evil
shall come forth to the resurrection of damnation.” Can a man of
sense believe that those who have done evil can “come forth to the
resurrection of damnation,” and yet all men be saved?

9. Rev. xx. 13-15, we find an account of the dead standing before
God and being “judged every man according to their works,” and the
declaration is made that “whosoever was not found written in the book
of life, was cast into the lake of fire.” Can a man of sense believe
that the dead shall be raised and judged according to their works, and
the wicked, or those whose names are not written in the book of life,
shall be cast into the lake of fire, and yet all men be saved?

10. Gal. v. 2, Paul testifies to certain men, “Christ shall profit you
nothing.” Can a man of sense believe that those shall be saved whom
Christ shall profit nothing?

11. Heb. vi., Paul declares of certain persons, that it is impossible
to renew them again to repentance. Can a man of sense believe that
those can be saved whom it is impossible to renew again to repentance?

12. Heb. ix. 27, Paul says, “It is appointed unto men once to die,
but after this the judgment.” Can a man of sense believe that “it is
appointed unto men once to die, but _after this the judgment_,” and not
believe that God will judge men after death?

13. Luke xvi. 22, 23, we read of a “certain rich man,” that “the rich
man died, and was buried; and in hell he lifted up his eyes, being in
torments.” Can a man of sense believe that a man after he died and was
buried, was “in torments,” and believe that there are no torments after
death?

14. Matt. xxv., the Lord says of the wicked, “These shall go away
into everlasting punishment; but the righteous into life eternal.” Be
it observed, these righteous are in the life of a christian already,
or before they go into _life eternal_, and the wicked are

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

Page 0
_ Sold by W.
Page 1
with Biographical and Interesting Anecdotes 1 6 Watt's Catechism and Prayers, in 1 vol.
Page 2
The hour of the sale not being come, they were conversing on the badness of the times; and one of the company called to a plain, clean, old man, with white locks, 'Pray, Father Abraham, what think you of the times? Will not those heavy taxes quite ruin the country! How shall we be ever able to pay them? What would you advise us to?'----Father Abraham stood up, and replied, 'If you would have my advice, I will give it you in short; "for a word to the wise is enough," as Poor Richard says.
Page 3
[Illustration: Published by W.
Page 4
" Leisure is time for doing something useful; this leisure the diligent man will obtain, but the lazy man never; for "A life of leisure and a life of laziness are two things.
Page 5
] 'Trusting too much to others' care is the ruin of many; for, "In the affairs of this world, men are saved, not by faith, but by the want of it:" but a man's own care is profitable; for, "If you would have a faithful servant, and one that you like,--serve yourself.
Page 6
Remember what poor Richard says, "Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou shalt sell thy necessaries.
Page 7
"It is hard for an empty bag to stand upright.
Page 8
yet you are about to put yourself under that tyranny, when you run in debt for such dress! Your creditor has authority, at his pleasure, to deprive you of your liberty, by confining you in gaol for life, or by selling you for a servant, if you should not be able to pay him.
Page 9
' * * * * * Thus the old gentleman ended his harangue.