A Book of Gems Choice selections from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 326

stand-point, which makes the treatise valuable to those
searching for the truth. As the name indicates, this
little book truly presents a feast.—_C. M. Wilmeth._

Brethren A. B. Jones, G. W. Longan, J. Z. Taylor and
Thomas Munnell. These are among our most thoughtful
writers. They have done their work well, and we commend
the book to all who feel an interest (and all ought to) in
having and holding correct views on the subjects of the
influence of the Holy Spirit as our indwelling comforter.
The book concludes with a selection—The influence of the
Holy Spirit in Conversion and Sanctification—from the
writings of A. Campbell.—_Dr. W. H. Hopson._

A neat little volume, executed in faultless style. It
consists of several essays, original and reprint, from
leading thinkers of the Christian Church. It opens with
an article by Elder A. B. Jones, upon “Consciousness
and the Holy Spirit,” and this is followed by one by G.
W. Longan. There are essays by Thomas Munnell and other
writers, upon the same subject, taking a different view of
the same subject. But the most important in the volume is
an old essay of A. Campbell, on the Holy Spirit. To those
desiring the views of able men upon this question we would
commend the book.—_B. W. Johnson._

Address all orders to JOHN BURNS, Publisher,
717 Olive Street, St. Louis, Mo.




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Text Comparison with Franklin's Autobiography (Eclectic English Classics)

Page 11
But my father in the mean time, from a view of the expense of a college education, which, having so large a family, he could not well afford, and the mean living many so educated were afterward able to obtain,--reasons that he gave to his friends in my hearing,--altered his first intention, took me from the grammar school, and sent me to a school for writing and arithmetic, kept by a then famous man, Mr.
Page 22
At length, a fresh difference arising between my brother and me, I took upon me to assert my freedom, presuming that he would not venture to produce the new indentures.
Page 45
He seemed quite to forget his wife and child, and I, by degrees, my engagements with Miss Read, to whom I never wrote more than one letter, and that was to let her know I was not likely soon to return.
Page 48
It was two pair of stairs backward, at an Italian warehouse.
Page 55
He went directly, signed the indentures, was put into the ship, and came over, never writing a line to acquaint his friends what was become of him.
Page 58
We continued there near three months; and by that time I could reckon among my acquired friends Judge Allen, Samuel Bustill, the secretary of the province, Isaac Pearson, Joseph Cooper, and several of the Smiths, members of Assembly, and Isaac Decow, the surveyor general.
Page 63
By this means the attention of the public was fixed on that paper, and Keimer's proposals, which were burlesqued and ridiculed, were disregarded.
Page 66
inhabitants in the province, since I now saw all the old houses inhabited and many new ones building; whereas, I remembered well that when I first walked about the streets of Philadelphia, eating my roll, I saw most of the houses in Walnut Street, between Second and Front Streets, with bills on their doors, "To be Let;" and many likewise in Chestnut Street and other streets, which made me then think the inhabitants of the city were deserting it one after another.
Page 77
Avoid extremes; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.
Page 81
) And, conceiving God to be the fountain of wisdom, I thought it right and necessary to solicit his assistance for obtaining it.
Page 87
" When another asserted something that I thought an error, I denied myself the pleasure of contradicting him abruptly, and of showing immediately some absurdity in his proposition; and in answering I began by observing that in certain cases or circumstances his opinion would be right, but in the present case there "appeared" or "seemed" to me some difference, etc.
Page 88
[115] ["I AM NOW ABOUT TO WRITE AT HOME, AUGUST, 1788, BUT CANNOT HAVE THE HELP EXPECTED FROM MY PAPERS, MANY OF THEM BEING LOST IN THE WAR.
Page 111
] [Footnote 129: Written words endure.
Page 115
legislator in the Assembly.
Page 133
; but that sum being insufficient, I advanced upward of two hundred pounds more, and in two weeks the one hundred and fifty wagons, with two hundred and fifty-nine carrying horses,[169] were on their march for the camp.
Page 137
How different was the conduct of our French friends in 1781, who, during a march through the most inhabited part of our country from Rhode Island to Virginia, near seven hundred miles, occasioned not the smallest complaint for the loss of a pig, a chicken, or even an apple.
Page 142
Finding ourselves now posted securely, and having a place to retreat to on occasion, we ventured out in parties to scour the adjacent country.
Page 147
] [Footnote 177: Relieved one another in military duty.
Page 151
He gave me the first information that my old friend James Ralph was still alive; that he was esteemed one of the best political writers in England; had been employed in the dispute between Prince Frederic and the king, and had obtained a pension of three hundred a year; that his reputation was indeed small as a poet, Pope having damned his poetry in the "Dunciad," but his prose was thought as good as any man's.
Page 170
But this they might have known before, if they had taken his advice.