A Book of Gems Choice selections from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 92

of the dancing was.

I. Sam. xviii. 6: “And it came to pass, as they came, when David was
returning from the slaughter of the Philistines, that the women came
out of all the cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King
Saul, with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music.” 1. This
dancing was in daylight. 2. The women alone danced. 3. It was rejoicing
in view of a special favor of God.

I. Sam. xxx. 16: “And when he had brought him down, behold, they were
spread abroad upon all the earth, eating, and drinking, and dancing,
because of all the great spoil they had taken out of the land of the
Philistines, and out of the land of Judah. And David smote them from
the twilight even unto the evening of the next day; and there escaped
not a man of them, save four hundred young men, who rode upon camels,
and fled.” In this case the dancing was with eating and drinking, and
for amusement. It was revelling. They were not religious people, but
the wicked, and the calamity soon came upon them.

II. Sam. vi. 12-14: “And it was told King David, saying, The Lord hath
blessed the house of Obed-edom, and all that pertaineth unto him,
because of the ark of God. So David went and brought up the ark of
God from the house of Obed-edom into the city of David with gladness.
And it was so, that when they that bear the ark of the Lord, had gone
six paces, he sacrificed oxen and fatlings. And David danced before
the Lord with all his might; and David was girded with a linen epod.”
This dancing was in daylight. David alone danced. It was a religious
exercise, in devotion to the Lord.

I. Chron. xv. 29: “And it came to pass, as the ark of the covenant of
the Lord came to the city of David, that Michal, the daughter of Saul,
looking out at a window, saw King David dancing and playing, and she
despised him in her heart.” This dancing was in daylight. David alone
danced. He danced as a religious exercise. It was not dancing for
amusement.

Psalms cl. 4: “Praise him with a timbrel and dance; praise him with
stringed instruments and organs.” Also, Psalms cxlix. 3: “Let them
praise his name in the dance.” This also is a religious exercise.

Eccl. iii. 4: “A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn,
and a time to dance.” We do not remember the point made on this. We
have

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Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

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_ Sold by W.
Page 1
coloured 1 6 Portraits of Curious Characters in London, &c.
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'It would be thought a hard government that should tax its people one-tenth part of their time to be employed in its service: but idleness taxes many of us much more; sloth, by bringing.
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"Diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industry.
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"--If you were a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle? Are you then your own master? be ashamed to catch yourself idle, when there is so much to be done for yourself, your family, your country, and your king.
Page 5
A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost; for want of a shoe the horse was lost; and for want of a horse the rider was lost;" being overtaken and slain by the enemy; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe nail.
Page 6
" And again, "At a great pennyworth pause a while:" he means, that perhaps the cheapness is apparent only, and not real; or the bargain, by straitening thee in thy business, may do thee more harm than good.
Page 7
'But what madness it must be to run in debt for these superfluities? We are offered, by the terms of this sale, six months credit; and that, perhaps, has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it.
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yet you are about to put yourself under that tyranny, when you run in debt for such dress! Your creditor has authority, at his pleasure, to deprive you of your liberty, by confining you in gaol for life, or by selling you for a servant, if you should not be able to pay him.
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The opening single quotes end pages later.