Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 0

[Illustration: FRANKLIN ARMS]

[Illustration: FRANKLIN SEAL]

[Illustration: Franklin at the Court of Louis XVI

"He was therefore, feasted and invited to all the court
parties. At these he sometimes met the old Duchess of
Bourbon, who, being a chess player of about his force,
they very generally played together. Happening once to
put her king into prize, the Doctor took it. 'Ah,' says
she, 'we do not take kings so.' 'We do in America,' said
the Doctor."--Thomas Jefferson.]




AUTOBIOGRAPHY

OF

BENJAMIN

FRANKLIN


WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
_by_
E. BOYD SMITH

EDITED
_by_
FRANK WOODWORTH PINE


[Illustration: Printers Mark]


_New York_
HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY
1916

Copyright, 1916,

BY
HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY


June, 1922


THE QUINN & BODEN CO. PRESS
RAHWAY, N. J.




CONTENTS



PAGE
Introduction vii

The Autobiography

I. Ancestry and Early Life in Boston 3
II. Beginning Life as a Printer 21
III. Arrival in Philadelphia 41
IV. First Visit to Boston 55
V. Early Friends in Philadelphia

Next Page

Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

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AND T.
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Virtue and Innocence, a Poem 1 0 The Economy of Human Life 1 0 Old Friends in a New Dress, or Selections from Esop's Fables, in Verse, 2 parts, plates 2 0 Little Jack Horner, in Verse, plain 1s.
Page 2
Judge, then, how much I must have been gratified by an incident I am going to relate to you.
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Darton, Junr.
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" II.
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Octr.
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Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they knew not the getting of; they think "it is day, and will never be night:" that a little to be spent out of so much is not worth minding; but "Always taking out of the meal-tub, and never putting in, soon comes to the bottom," as Poor Richard says; and then, "When the well is dry, they know the worth of water.
Page 7
"--What would you think of that prince, or of that government, who should issue an edict forbidding you to dress like a gentleman or gentlewoman, on pain of imprisonment or servitude? Would you not say that you were free, have a right to dress as you please, and that such an edict would be a breach of your privileges, and such a government tyrannical? And.
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And when you have got the Philosopher's stone, sure you will no longer complain of bad times, or the difficulty of paying taxes.
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The opening single quotes end pages later.