Benjamin Franklin Representative selections, with introduction, bibliograpy, and notes

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 230

{7} and breakfast.

8}
9} Work.
10}
11}

NOON. {12} Read, or overlook my accounts,
{ 1} and dine.

2}
3}
4} Work.
5}

EVENING. {6} Put things in their places. Supper.
_Question._ What good {7} Music or diversion, or conversation.
have I done to-day? {8} Examination of the day.
{9}

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Text Comparison with Benjamin Franklin Representative selections, with introduction, bibliograpy, and notes

Page 69
Welcomed as the apotheosis of "les Insurgens,"[i-331] he was virtually deified; as Turgot expressed it, _Eripuit caelo fulmen sceptrumque tyrannis_.
Page 97
[i-100] _Writings_, II, 229.
Page 133
Review in _Monthly Review_, LXII, 199-210, 298-308, describes his electrical experiments as constituting a "_principia_" of electricity.
Page 240
It is true that, if you can clamber and get to the top of a staircase without using the steps, you will more easily gain them in descending; but certainly, if you begin with the lowest you will with more ease ascend to the top; and I would therefore offer it to the consideration of those who superintend the education of our youth, whether, since many of those who begin with the Latin quit the same after spending some years without having made any great proficiency, and what they have learnt becomes almost useless, so that their time has been lost, it would not have been better to have begun with the French, proceeding to the Italian, etc.
Page 255
to Monday May 28.
Page 318
Whether by the Fire, or in a Battle, or choak'd with a Dishclout, or by a Stroke against a Stone, thy Dissolution happens; 'tis all alike to thy avaritious Owner; he grieves not for thee, but for the Shilling with which he purchased thee! If thy Bottom Part should chance to survive, it may be preserv'd to hold bits of Candles, or Blacking for Shoes, or Salve for kibed Heels; but all thy other Members will be for ever buried in some miry Hole; or less carefully disposed of, so that little Children, who have not yet arrived to Acts of Cruelty, may gather them up to furnish out their Baby Houses: Or, being cast upon the Dunghill, they will therewith be carted into Meadow Grounds; where, being spread abroad and discovered, they must be thrown to the Heap of Stones, Bones and Rubbish; or being left until the Mower finds them with his Scythe, they will with bitter Curses be tossed over the Hedge; and so serve for unlucky Boys to throw at Birds and Dogs; until by Length of Time and numerous Casualties, they shall be press'd into their Mother Earth, and be converted to their original Principles.
Page 320
These valuable Qualifications, with many others so much endear'd him to me, that although it should be so, that, contrary to all Probability, contrary to my Prediction and his own, he might possibly be yet alive, yet my Loss of Honour as a Prognosticator, cannot afford me so much Mortification, as his Life, Health and Safety would give me Joy and Satisfaction.
Page 361
So heavy Taxes tend to diminish a People.
Page 365
.
Page 411
_ | | 12 | 16 | [Saturn] rise 12 21 | | 13 |[Virgo] 1 | 7 *s sets 9 30 | | 14 | 15 | [Jupiter] set 12 26 | | 15 | 29 | Sirius set 10 2 | | 16 |[Libra] 13 | [Mars] rise 2 55 | | 17 | 27 | [Venus] sets 10 37 | | 18 |[Scorpio] 10 | .
Page 419
| 4 58 | 7 2 | | 10 | 5 | _then fine_ | 4 57 | 7 3 | | 11 | 6 | _growing_ | 4 56 | 7 4 | | 12 | 7 | _weather,_ | 4 56 | 7 4 | | 13 | G |3 past Easter.
Page 438
| M.
Page 451
| 4 57 | 7 3 | | 2 | 5 | _More temperate_| 4 58 | 7 2 | | 3 | 6 |Days dec.
Page 466
| _Cost, acts foolishly;_| | 7 | 21 | 7 *s rise 9 0 | | 8 |[Aquarius] 3 | _and he_ | | 9 | 15 | _that counts before_| | 10 | 27 | _he builds,_ | | 11 |[Pisces] 8 | _finds he did not_ | | 12 | 20 | [Saturn] set 11 16 | | 13 |[Aries] 2 | 7 *s rise 8 40 | | 14 | 14 | [Jupiter] ri.
Page 507
m.
Page 518
, and am glad to hear that you increase in Strength; I hope you will continue mending, 'till you recover your former Health and firmness.
Page 520
SIR, I return you the loose sheets of the plan, with thanks to your Excellency for communicating them.
Page 612
Under all these obligations, are our poor modest, humble, and thankful? And do they use their best endeavours to maintain themselves, and lighten our shoulders of this burthen? On the contrary, I affirm, that there is no country in the world in which the poor are more idle, dissolute, drunken, and insolent.
Page 730
Your NewsPapers are fill'd with fictitious Accounts of Anarchy, Confusion, Distresses, and Miseries, we are suppos'd to be involv'd in, as Consequences of.
Page 773
[14] Consult C.