Experiments and Observations on Electricity Made at Philadelphia in America

By Benjamin Franklin

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...Transcriber's note: Text enclosed by underscores is in italics (_italics_).
In view of the difficulty of...

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...reflections, to a
probable cause of those phaenomena, which are at once the most awful, and,
hitherto,...

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...electrical fire is
crouded _into the substance_ of the former, the glass confining it.

2. At the...

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...when you form a direct communication as above.

So wonderfully are these two states of Electricity,...

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...thread instantly attracted by the bottle. (This is best
done by a vinegar cruet, or some...

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...in your hand. As
often as he touches it, he will be electrified _plus_; and any...

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...the upper to the lower part of the
bottle, to restore the equilibrium is render'd strongly...

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...less, according to
the quantity of Electricity.--When in this state, if you present to the
shot the...

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...a wood fire; and the light of red-hot iron do
it likewise; but not at so...

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...between
either of them and the person on the floor.

4. After such strong spark, neither of...

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..._&c._ We suppose
it was _driven off_, and not brought on thro' that wire; and that...

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...the fire appears every where upon the gold like a
flash of lightning: not upon the...

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...hook of the other; then there will be an
explosion and shock, and both bottles will...

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...the bottle by one
part, and did not enter in again by another; then, if a...

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...is not said to be _charg'd_ with elasticity when bent, and
discharg'd when unbent; its quantity...

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...remain in the
first bottle. The latter we found to be true: for that bottle on...

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...for the reason
given s 10. We made also of large glass panes, magical pictures, and
self-moving...

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...a quire of paper is thought good armour against the push
of a sword or even...

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...it, did not seem in the least to retard its
motion.--This is called an electrical jack;...

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...turn twelve sparks, to the
thimbles, which make seven thousand two hundred sparks; and the bullet...

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...allowing (for the reasons before given, s 8, 9, 10,) that there is
no more electrical...

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...quantity, so will the cork be repelled again: And so may the
experiment be repeated as...

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...being strongly electrified (as well as when heated by common fire)
rises in vapours more copiously;...

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...fire gives repulsion to the
particles of water, and destroys their attraction of cohesion; hence common
fire,...

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...Hence clouds formed by vapours raised from fresh waters within land,
from growing vegetables, moist earth,...

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...having fertilized a country
of very great extent.

32. If a country be plain, having no mountains...

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...of electrical attraction is far beyond the distance of
flashing.

36. When a great number of clouds...

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...motion, and leaping
from body to body, or from particle to particle thro' the air. When...

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...surface of your body; whereas, if
your clothes were dry, it would go thro' the body.

Hence...

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...the melted part would burn the
floor it dropp'd on. But if a sword can be...

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...doubt, whether the electrical matter passes thro' the
substance of bodies, or only over and along...

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...(generally) more than it
can contain, otherwise all loose portions of it would repel each other,...

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...being already
full. The fluid therefore will flow round its surface, and form an
electrical atmosphere. Bring...

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...has the line A, E, for its basis. So the portion of atmosphere
included in H,...

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...and receive what is so discharged.

17. But points have a property, by which they _draw...

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...is it of much importance to us, to know the manner in which nature
executes her...

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...Suspend the beam
by a packthread from the cieling, so that the bottom of the scales...

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...the punch; or if in its course it
would have come nigh enough to strike, yet...

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...but
afterwards a pullet struck dead in like manner, being recovered by
repeatedly blowing into its lungs,...

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...it, from a large electrified jar or
sheet of glass. Then if your strips of glass...

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...fire must leap over the vacancies; there is a certain distance which it
is able to...

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...a right angle, the two next obtuse angles, and the
lowest a very acute one; and...

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...greatest quantity. This latter position may seem
a paradox to some, being contrary to the hitherto...

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...the bottle, though the same in
quantity, cannot be the very same fire that entered at...

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...more of this electrical fluid than
other common matter: That when it is blown, as it...

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...surface than the glass would
naturally draw in; this increases the repelling power on that side,...

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...floor. Every electrician knows that a globe wet within
will afford little or no fire, but...

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...from the mutual repulsion of its particles,
tends to dissipation, and would immediately dissipate _in vacuo_.--And...

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...impossibility of success, in the experiments propos'd,
to draw out the effluvial virtues of a non-electric,...

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...a strong purgative liquid, and then charged
the phial, and took repeated shocks from it, in...

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...electrical fire from the floor to the cushion; then, if
there be no fine points or...

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...electrified by that discharge.




CORRECTIONS _and_ ADDITIONS
_to the_ PRECEDING PAPERS.


Page 2, Sect. 1. We since find,...

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...of studying it; with its Analysis or Division into Species,
according to former Authors, and a...

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...their Tails and Atmospheres accounted for. Illustrated also by a
Copper-Plate. By G. Smith. Price 1s.


IV....

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...on
the liquor.

[6] Thunder-gusts are sudden storms of thunder and...