Franklin's Autobiography (Eclectic English Classics)

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 110

complained to me that they
were grievously calumniated by the zealots of other persuasions, and
charged with abominable principles and practices to which they were
utter strangers. I told him this had always been the case with new
sects, and that, to put a stop to such abuse, I imagined it might be
well to publish the articles of their belief and the rules of their
discipline. He said that it had been proposed among them, but not
agreed to, for this reason: "When we were first drawn together as a
society," says he, "it had pleased God to enlighten our minds so far
as to see that some doctrines, which we once esteemed truths, were
errors; and that others, which we have esteemed errors, were real
truths. From time to time He has been pleased to afford us further
light, and our principles have been improving and our errors
diminishing. Now we are not sure that we are arrived at the end of
this progression and at the perfection of spiritual or theological
knowledge, and we fear that if we should once print our confession of
faith we should feel ourselves as if bound and confined by it, and
perhaps be unwilling to receive further improvement, and our
successors still more so, as conceiving what we, their elders and
founders, had done to be something sacred, never to be departed from."

This modesty in a sect is perhaps a singular instance in the history
of mankind, every other sect supposing itself in possession of all
truth, and that those who differ are so far in the wrong. Like a man
traveling in foggy weather; those at some distance before him on the
road he sees wrapped up in the fog as well as those behind him, and
also the people in the fields on each side, but near him all appears
clear, though in truth he is as much in the fog as any of them. To
avoid this kind of embarrassment the Quakers have of late years been
gradually declining the public service in the Assembly and in the
magistracy, choosing rather to quit their power than their principle.

In order of time I should have mentioned before that, having in 1742
invented an open stove[137] for the better warming of rooms and at the
same time saving fuel, as the fresh air admitted was warmed in
entering, I made a present of the model to Mr. Robert Grace, one of my
early friends, who, having an iron furnace, found the casting of the
plates for these stoves a profitable thing, as they

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 27
The consequence of this should be, as I conceive, that the heated lighter air, being pressed on all sides, must ascend, and the heavier descend; and, as this rising cannot be in all parts, or the whole area of the tract at once, for that would leave too extensive a vacuum, the rising will begin precisely in that column that happens to be the lightest, or most rarefied; and the warm air will flow horizontally from all points to this column, where the several currents meeting, and joining to rise, a whirl is naturally formed, in the same manner as a whirl is formed in the tub of water, by the descending fluid flowing from all sides of the tub, to the hole in the centre.
Page 30
Mather, describing a whirlwind, says, "a thick dark small cloud arose, with a pillar of light in it, of about eight or ten feet diameter, and passed along the ground in a tract not wider than a street, horribly tearing up trees by the roots, blowing them up in the air like feathers, and throwing up stones of.
Page 71
half inch circle.
Page 120
7 100 90 79 8 100 88 81 ---- ---- ---- 813 717 632 ---- ---- ---- Medium 101 Medium 89 Medium 79 I made many other experiments, but the above are those in which I was most exact; and they serve sufficiently to show that the difference is considerable.
Page 123
On these two hooks hang the two bodies, the thread that connects.
Page 151
| 1| 7 A.
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| | --| | 1 | | 76 | | | 194 |36 26|58 8| | | --| | 4 | 68 | 76 | | | | | | | | --| | 8 | | 78 | | | | | | | | 5| 8 | | 68 | 76 | | NE | | | |Ditto.
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| | 14 | 8 | | 70 | 70 | |N 74 E| 111 |42 0|39 57| | | -- | |Noon| | 72 |ESE | | | | | | | -- | | 4 | | 71 | | | | | | | | 15 | 8 | | 61 | 69 | | | | | | | | -- | |Noon| | 68 |WSW |N 70 E| 186 |43 3|35 51| | | -- | | 4 | | 67 | | | | | | | | 16 | |Noon| 65 | 67 |S W |N 67 W| 48 |43 22|34 50| | | -- | | 4 | | 63 | | | | | | .
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II.
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But my friend, who made no pretension to such kind of knowledge, afterwards discovered the cause himself.
Page 232
Some clear burning charcoals were put into the opening of the short tube A, and supported there by the grate B.
Page 261
--And if you were to repeat, with your naturally exact attention and observation, the common experiment of the bell in the exhausted receiver, possibly something new may occur to you, in considering, 1.
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"M.
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_ [No date.
Page 276
| | present letters thus, _uh_; a short,| | | | | and not very strong _aspiration_.
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V.
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wars carried on there against the French, not merely in the cause of the colonies, 105.
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_Conductors_ of lightning, very common in America, i.
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24.
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further observations on, 393.