Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

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[Illustration: Benjamin Franklin

I am, Yours, B Franklin

New-York, Harper & Brothers.]

MEMOIRS

OF

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN;

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.


WITH HIS

MOST INTERESTING ESSAYS, LETTERS, AND MISCELLANEOUS
WRITINGS; FAMILIAR, MORAL, POLITICAL,
ECONOMICAL, AND PHILOSOPHICAL.


SELECTED WITH CARE

FROM ALL HIS PUBLISHED PRODUCTIONS, AND COMPRISING
WHATEVER IS MOST ENTERTAINING AND VALUABLE
TO THE GENERAL READER.


IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.


NEW YORK:
HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,
FRANKLIN SQUARE.




PUBLISHERS' ADVERTISEMENT.


It would be difficult, and perhaps impossible, to gather from the
history and labours of any individual mind, a summary of practical
wisdom as rich in varied instruction as the memoirs and writings
presented in these volumes will be found to afford. If, on account of
the most distinguished public services, the name of Franklin has become
inseparably associated with his country's glory, the works which he has
left behind him no less justly entitle him to be considered as the
benefactor not only of his own country, but of mankind for all coming
time. So admirable, indeed, are these productions, that they can only
cease being read when the love of beauty and of simplicity, of moral
power and of truth, has no longer a place in the hearts of men.

"This self-taught American," to quote from the Edinburgh Review of 1806,
"is the most rational, perhaps, of all philosophers. He never loses
sight of common sense in any of his speculations. No individual,
perhaps, ever possessed a juster understanding, or was so seldom
obstructed in the use of it by indolence, enthusiasm, or authority. * *
* * There are not many among the thoroughbred scholars and philosophers
of Europe who can lay claim to distinction in more than one or two
departments of science and literature. The uneducated tradesman of
America has left writings which call for our attention in natural
philosophy, in politics, in political economy, and in general literature
and morality." And again: "Nothing can be more perfectly and beautifully
adapted to its object than most of the moral compositions of Dr.
Franklin. The tone of familiarity, of good-will, and harmless
jocularity; the plain and pointed illustrations; the short sentences,
made

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Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

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It is certainly better calculated to convey a general idea of the subject, than any attempt of the kind which has yet fallen under our observation.
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with Biographical and Interesting Anecdotes 1 6 Watt's Catechism and Prayers, in 1 vol.
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'It would be thought a hard government that should tax its people one-tenth part of their time to be employed in its service: but idleness taxes many of us much more; sloth, by bringing.
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[Illustration] "If time be of all things the most precious, wasting time must be" as Poor Richard says, "the greatest prodigality;" since, as he elsewhere tells us, "Lost time is never found again; and what we call time enough, always proves little enough.
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"--If you were a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle? Are you then your own master? be ashamed to catch yourself idle, when there is so much to be done for yourself, your family, your country, and your king.
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] [Illustration: Published by W.
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Remember what poor Richard says, "Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou shalt sell thy necessaries.
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But poverty often deprives a man of all spirit and virtue.
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[Illustration] 'And now to conclude, "Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other," as Poor Richard says, and scarce in that; for it is true, "We may give advice, but we cannot give conduct.
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--I am, as ever, thine to serve thee, RICHARD SAUNDERS.