Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 122

diem. 2. That the pay commence from the time of their joining the
forces at Will's Creek (which must be on or before the 20th of May
ensuing), and that a reasonable allowance be paid over and above
for the time necessary for their travelling to Will's Creek and
home again after their discharge. 3. Each wagon and team, and every
saddle or packhorse, is to be valued by indifferent persons, chosen
between me and the owner; and in case of the loss of any wagon,
team, or other horse in the service, the price, according to such
valuation, is to be allowed and paid. 4. Seven days' pay is to be
advanced and paid in hand by me to the owner of each wagon and
team, or horse, at the time of contracting, if required; and the
remainder to be paid by General Braddock, or by the paymaster of
the army, at the time of their discharge; or from time to time, as
it shall be demanded. 5. No drivers of wagons or persons taking
care of the hired horses are, on any account, to be called upon to
do the duty of soldiers, or be otherwise employed than in
conducting or taking care of their carriages or horses. 6. All
oats, Indian corn, or other forage that wagons or horses bring to
the camp, more than is necessary for the subsistence of the horses,
is to be taken for the use of the army, and a reasonable price paid
for the same.

"_Note._--My son, William Franklin, is empowered to enter into like
contracts with any person in Cumberland county.

"B. FRANKLIN."

I received of the general

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

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16 The Waste of Life 22 Self-denial not the Essence of Virtue 25 On the Usefulness of the Mathematics 27 The Art of procuring Pleasant Dreams 31 Advice to a young Tradesman 37 Rules of Health 39 The Ephemera; an Emblem of Human Life.
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* * * * * THE WAY TO WEALTH, _As dearly shown in the practice of an old Pennsylvania Almanac, entitled, "Poor Richard Improved.
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If we are industrious, we shall never starve; for, _At the workingman's house hunger looks in, but dares not enter_.
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"He was a man of sense, and more deserving than most others in the same post; but, as he was of a modest disposition, he constantly declined, and made great difficulties of engaging himself in public business.
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, divinity, law, and physic, were, for no other offence than writing on controverted points of church government, exposed on public scaffolds, and stigmatized and mutilated as common signal rogues or the most ordinary malefactors.
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This is considered as a privileged place, and stands like the land of Goshen amid the plagues of Egypt.
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But habit reconciles everything.
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I write by this post to cousin William, to continue his care which I doubt not he will do.
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Be studious in your profession, and you will be learned.
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FRANKLIN.
Page 152
Do you not remember the story you told me of the Scotch sergeant who met with a party of forty American soldiers, and, though alone, disarmed them all and brought them in prisoners? a story almost as improbable as that of an Irishman, who pretended to have alone taken and brought in five of the enemy by _surrounding_ them.
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Vaughan.
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Had his counsels in those pieces been attended to by the ministers, how much bloodshed might have been prevented, and how much expense and disgrace to the nation avoided! "Your reflections on the constant calmness and composure attending his death are very sensible.
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Such changes in the superficial parts of the globe seemed to me unlikely to happen if the earth were solid to the centre.
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In my.
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Might not a wave, by any means raised in this supposed internal ocean of extremely dense fluid, raise, in some degree as it passes, the present shell of incumbent earth, and break it in some places, as in earthquakes.
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* * * * * CAUSES OF EARTHQUAKES.
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_ ON THE ART OF SWIMMING.
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That though the legs, arms, and head of a human body, being solid parts, are specifically something heavier than fresh water, yet the trunk, particularly the upper part, from its hollowness, is so much lighter than water, as.
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p.