Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 129

learning their exercise, the governor
prevailed with me to take charge of our northwestern frontier, which was
infested by the enemy, and provide for the defence of the inhabitants by
raising troops and building a line of forts. I undertook this military
business, though I did not conceive myself well qualified for it. He
gave me a commission, with full powers, and a parcel of blank
commissions for officers, to be given to whom I thought fit. I had but
little difficulty in raising men, having soon five hundred and sixty
under my command. My son, who had in the preceding war been an officer
in the army raised against Canada, was my aiddecamp, and of great use to
me. The Indians had burned Gnadenhutten, a village settled by the
Moravians, and massacred the inhabitants; but the place was thought a
good situation for one of the forts. In order to march thither, I
assembled the companies at Bethlehem, the chief establishment of those
people; I was surprised to find it in so good a posture of defence; the
destruction of Gnadenhutten had made them apprehend danger. The
principal buildings were defended by a stockade; they had purchased a
quantity of arms and ammunition from New-York, and had even placed
quantities of small paving stones between the windows of their high
stone houses, for their women to throw them down upon the heads of any
Indians that should attempt to force into them. The armed brethren, too,
kept watch, and relieved each other on guard as methodically as in any
garrison town. In conversation with the bishop, Spangenberg, I
mentioned my surprise; for, knowing that they had obtained an act of
parliament exempting them from military duties in the colonies, I had
supposed they were conscientiously scrupulous of bearing arms. He
answered me, "That it was not one of their established principles; but
that, at the time of their obtaining that act, it was thought to be a
principle with many of their people. On this occasion, however, they, to
their surprise, found it adopted by but a few." It seems they were
either deceived in themselves or deceived the parliament; but common
sense, aided by present danger, will sometimes be too strong for
whimsical opinions.

It was the beginning of January when we set out upon this business of
building forts; I sent one detachment towards the Minisink, with
instructions to erect one for the security of that upper part of the
country, and another to the lower part with similar instructions; and I
concluded to go myself with the rest of my force to Gnadenhutten,

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 2
Life of Franklin, continued by Dr.
Page 7
The last six lines I remember, but have forgotten the preceding ones of the stanza; the purpose of them was, that his censures proceeded from good-will, and, therefore, he would be known to be the author.
Page 9
He had an excellent constitution, was of a middle stature, well set, and very strong: he could draw prettily, was a little skilled in music; his voice was sonorous and agreeable, so that when he played on his violin and sung withal, as he was accustomed to do after the business of the day was over, it was extremely agreeable to hear.
Page 16
I read about this time _Locke on the Human Understanding_, and the _Art of Thinking_, by Messrs.
Page 18
mine, I contrived to disguise my hand, and, writing an anonymous paper, I put it at night under the door of the printing-house.
Page 59
My friends there, who considered I had been of some service, thought fit to reward me by employing me in printing the money; a very profitable job, and a great help to me; this was another advantage gained by my being able to write.
Page 77
" It was lucky for me that I had one as much disposed to industry and frugality as myself.
Page 85
_ { 1} Sleep.
Page 124
, &c.
Page 125
And though he had now above one thousand men, and the enemy who had beaten Braddock did not at most exceed four hundred Indians and French.
Page 131
When they were set up, our carpenters built a platform of boards all round within, about six feet high, for the men to stand on when to fire through the loopholes.
Page 141
Going myself one morning to pay my respects, I found in his antechamber one Innis, a messenger of Philadelphia, who had come thence express, with a packet from Governor Denny for the general.
Page 154
asserted, that the honour of completing the experiment with the electrical kite does not belong to Franklin.
Page 163
They blindly persevered in their own schemes, and left to the colonists no alternative but opposition or unconditional submission.
Page 172
It may be presumed the historians of the American revolution will exhibit them in proper colours.
Page 182
Secretary Conway, &c.
Page 190
_ Suppose an act of internal regulations connected with a tax, how would they receive it? _A.
Page 197
_ Yes, always; but the requisitions have generally been for some service expressed, as to raise, clothe, and pay troops, and not for money only.
Page 201
They had one child, about three years old.
Page 208
So that, when there is fear of a war about to break out between England and Spain, an English merchant there, who apprehends the confiscation of his goods as the goods of an enemy, thinks them safe if he can get a Spaniard to take charge of them; for the Spaniard secures them as his own, and faithfully redelivers them,.