Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 148

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in one thousand pounds to the society, which they will pay, but we
are like to lose the rest. He had this year received twenty-six
admission payments of twenty-five guineas each, which he did not
bring to account.

"While attending this affair, I had an opportunity of looking over
the old council books and journals of the society; and having a
curiosity to see how I came in (of which I had never been
informed), I looked back for the minutes relating to it. You must
know it is not usual to admit persons that have not requested to be
admitted; and a recommendatory certificate in favour of the
candidate, signed by at least three of the members is by our rule
to be presented to the society, expressing that he is desirous of
that honour, and is so and so qualified. As I had never asked or
expected the honour, I was, as I said before, curious to see how
the business was managed. I found that the certificate, worded very
advantageously for me, was signed by Lord Macclesfield, then
president, Lord Parker, and Lord Willoughby; that the election was
by a unanimous vote; and the honour being voluntarily conferred by
the society unsolicited by me, it was thought wrong to demand or
receive the usual fees or composition; so that my name was entered
on the list with a vote of council _that I was not to pay
anything_. And, accordingly, nothing has ever been demanded of me.
Those who are admitted in the common way pay five guineas as
admission fees, and two guineas and a half yearly contribution, or
twenty five guineas down in lieu of it. In my case a substantial
favour accompanied the honour."

[13] In a letter from Dr.

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Text Comparison with Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Page 1
First Visit to London 77 VII.
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In his swift, terse style, he is most like Defoe, who was the first great English journalist and master of the newspaper narrative.
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I remember him well, for when I was a boy he came over to my father in Boston, and lived in the house with us some years.
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In that case the stool was turned down again upon its feet, when the Bible remained concealed under it as before.
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The next morning the workmen were surprised at missing the stones, which were found in our wharf.
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About the end of April, 1724, a little vessel offer'd for Boston.
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" I agreed that this might be advantageous.
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I approv'd the amusing one's self with poetry now and then, so far as to improve one's language, but no farther.
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' The curiosities were in glass cases and constituted an amazing and motley collection--a petrified crab from China, a 'lignified hog,' Job's tears, Madagascar lances, William the Conqueror's flaming sword, and Henry the Eighth's coat of mail.
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Thus the matter.
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| T.
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Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.
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"That fewer still, in public affairs, act with a view to the good of mankind.
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1 3 _fine weather_, 4 Le 4 36 8 Moon set 10 12 aft 2 4 Ascension Day 5 19 4 35 8 _He that can have_ 3 5 Mars Sat.
Page 125
The governor put me into the commission of the peace; the corporation of the city chose me of the common council, and soon after an alderman; and the citizens at large chose me a burgess to represent them in Assembly.
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Yale College, in Connecticut, had before made me a similar compliment.
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With these orders I suppos'd the provisions might easily be purchas'd.
Page 154
And my new honour proved not much less brittle; for all our commissions were soon after broken by a repeal of the law in England.
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I then came home, and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my _whistle_, but disturbing all the family.