Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 191

aid, which they think ought to be
asked of them and granted by them, if they are to pay it, and can be
granted for them by no others whatsoever, whom they have not empowered
for that purpose.

_Q._ You say they do not object to the right of Parliament in laying
duties on goods to be paid on their importation: now, is there any kind
of difference between a duty on the _importation_ of goods and an
excise on their _consumption_?

_A._ Yes, a very material one: an excise, for the reasons I have just
mentioned, they think you can have no right to lay within their country.
But the _sea_ is yours: you maintain, by your fleets, the safety of
navigation in it, and keep it clear of pirates: you may have, therefore,
a natural and equitable right to some _toll_ or duty on merchandises
carried through that part of your dominions, towards defraying the
expense you are at in ships to maintain the safety of that carriage.

_Q._ Does this reasoning hold in the case of a duty laid on the produce
of their lands _exported_? And would they not then object to such a
duty?

_A._ If it tended to make the produce so much dearer abroad as to lessen
the demand for it, to be sure they would object to such a duty: not to
your right of laying it, but they would complain of it as a burden, and
petition you to lighten it. * * *

_Q._ Supposing the stamp-act continued and enforced, do you imagine that
ill-humour will induce the Americans to give as much for worse
manufactures of their own, and use them preferable to better of ours?

_A._ Yes, I think so. People will pay as freely to gratify one passion
as another, their resentment as their pride.

_Q._ Would the people at Boston discontinue their trade?

_A._ The merchants are a very small number compared with the body of the
people, and must discontinue their trade if nobody will buy their goods.

_Q._ What are the body of the people in the colonies?

_A._ They are farmers, husbandmen, or planters.

_Q._ Would they suffer the produce of their lands to rot?

_A._ No; but they would not raise so much. They would manufacture more
and plough less.

_Q._ Would they live without the administration of justice in civil
matters, and suffer all the inconveniences of such a situation for any
considerable time, rather than take the stamps, supposing the stamps
were protected by a sufficient force, where every one might have them?

_A._ I think the supposition impracticable,

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

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[2] This small estate would not have sufficed for their maintenance without the business of a smith, which had continued in the family down to my uncle's time, the eldest son being always brought up to that employment; a custom which he and my father followed with regard to their eldest sons.
Page 10
They lie buried together at Boston, where I some years since placed a marble over their grave with this inscription: JOSIAH FRANKLIN, and ABIAH, his wife, lie here interred.
Page 51
My London pamphlet (printed in 1725)--which had for its motto these lines of Dryden: "Whatever is, is right.
Page 56
They were sensible of the difference; it strengthened the hands of our friends in the house; and they voted us their printers for the year ensuing.
Page 60
I let her know that I expected as much money with their daughter.
Page 63
In all employments, generous, just he proved, Renown'd for courtesy, by all beloved.
Page 88
I cannot boast of much success in acquiring the _reality_ of this virtue, but I had a good deal with regard to the appearance of it.
Page 97
Those who chose never to attend, paid him six shillings a year to be excused, which was supposed to go to hiring substitutes, but was, in reality, more than was necessary for that purpose, and made the constableship a place of profit; and the constable, for a little drink, often got such ragamuffins about him as a watch that respectable housekeepers did not choose to mix with.
Page 110
Bond had omitted.
Page 119
: with these orders I supposed the provisions might easily be purchased.
Page 134
all our commissions were soon after broken by a repeal of the law in England.
Page 136
Kinnersly, an ingenious neighbour, who, being out of business, I encouraged to undertake showing the experiments for money, and drew up for him two lectures, in which the experiments were ranged in such order, and accompanied with explanations in such method, as that the foregoing should assist in comprehending the following.
Page 145
We had on board, as a passenger, Captain Archibald Kennedy, of the royal navy, afterward Earl of Cassilis, who contended that it was impossible, and that no ship ever sailed so fast, and that there must have been some error in the division of the logline, or some mistake in heaving the log.
Page 151
While Franklin was waiting for the erection of a spire, it occurred to him that he might have more ready access to the region of clouds by means of a common kite.
Page 152
He now presented his knuckle to the key, and received a strong spark.
Page 153
The similarity of lightning and electricity is so strong, that we need not be surprised at notice being taken of it as soon as electrical phenomena became familiar.
Page 168
During this state, when the severity of his pain sometimes drew forth a groan of complaint, he would observe, that he was afraid he did not bear them as he ought, acknowledged his grateful sense of the many blessings he had received from that Supreme Being who had raised him from small and low beginnings to such high rank and consideration among men, and made no doubt but his present afflictions were kindly intended to wean him from a world in which he was no longer fit to act the part assigned him.
Page 172
In this view Dr.
Page 201
This tribe accordingly went on diminishing, till there remained in their town on the manor but twenty persons, viz.
Page 207
prisoners to be tied behind them, and then, in a most cruel and brutal manner, put them to the sword; but he could not prevail on his men to massacre _their_ captives, because, in fight, they had laid down their arms, submitted, and demanded protection.