Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 38

sociable company in the cabin, and
lived uncommonly well, having the addition of all Mr. Hamilton's stores,
who had laid in plentifully. In this passage Mr. Denham contracted a
friendship for me, that continued during his life. The voyage was
otherwise not a pleasant one, as we had a great deal of bad weather.

When we came into the Channel, the captain kept his word with me, and
gave me an opportunity of examining the bag for the governor's letters;
I found some upon which my name was put, as under my care: I picked out
six or seven, that by the handwriting I thought might be the promised
letters, especially as one of them was addressed to Basket, the king's
printer, and another to some stationer. We arrived in London the 24th
December, 1724. I waited upon the stationer, who came first in my way,
delivering the letter as from Governor Keith. "I don't know such a
person," said he: but opening the letter, "Oh! this is from Riddlesden.
I have lately found him to be a complete rascal, and I will have nothing
to do with him, nor receive any letters from him." So, putting the
letter into my hand, he turned on his heel and left me to serve some
customer. I was surprised to find these were not the governor's letters;
and, after recollecting and comparing circumstances, I began to doubt
his sincerity. I found my friend Denham, and opened the whole affair to
him. He let me into Keith's character; told me there was not the least
probability that he had written any letters for me; that no one who knew
him had the smallest dependance on him; and he laughed at the idea of
the governor's giving me a letter of credit, having, as he said, no
credit to give. On my expressing some concern about what I should do, he
advised me to endeavour to get some employment in the way of my
business. Among the printers here, said he, you will improve yourself,
and when you return to America you will set up to greater advantage.

We both of us happened to know, as well as the stationer, that
Riddlesden, the attorney, was a very knave; he had half ruined Miss
Read's father, by persuading him to be bound for him. By his letter it
appeared there was a secret scheme on foot to the prejudice of Mr.
Hamilton (supposed to be then coming over with us); that Keith was
concerned in it, with Riddlesden. Denham, who was a friend of
Hamilton's, thought he ought to

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 20
My friend Collins, therefore, undertook to manage my flight.
Page 35
On this it was proposed that we should each of us, at our next meeting, produce a piece of our own composing, in order to improve by our mutual observations, criticisms, and corrections.
Page 40
My printing this pamphlet was another _erratum_.
Page 65
but have missed of being informed.
Page 69
In youth, therefore, the turn is given; in youth the education even of the next generation is given; in youth the private and public character is determined; and the term of life extending but from youth to age, life ought to begin well from youth; and more especially _before_ we take our party as to our principal objects.
Page 74
When they think well of individuals in your native country, they will go nearer to thinking well of your country; and when your countrymen see themselves thought well of by Englishmen, they will go nearer to thinking well of England.
Page 76
The objections and reluctances I met with in soliciting the subscriptions, made me soon feel the impropriety of presenting one's self as the proposer of any useful project that might be supposed to raise one's reputation in the smallest degree above that of one's neighbours, when one has need of their assistance to accomplish that project.
Page 101
Ours was a mere civil friendship, sincere on both sides, and lasted to his death.
Page 106
The Moravian happened not to please his colleagues, and on his death they resolved to have no other of that sect; the difficulty then was, how to avoid having two of some other sect, by means of the new choice.
Page 115
Thus, if you teach a poor young man to shave himself and keep his razor in order, you may contribute more to the happiness of his life than in giving him a thousand guineas.
Page 118
" "The governor," said I, "has not yet _blacked_ them enough.
Page 125
Shirley, was killed by his side; and out of eighty-six officers, sixty-three were killed or wounded, and seven hundred and fourteen men killed out of eleven hundred.
Page 138
Watson drew up a summary account of them, and of all I had afterward sent to England on the subject, which he accompanied with some praise of the writer.
Page 146
It was midnight, and our captain fast asleep; but Captain Kennedy, jumping upon deck and seeing the danger, ordered the ship to wear round, all sails standing; an operation dangerous to the masts, but it carried us clear, and we avoided shipwreck, for we were running fast on the rocks on which the light was erected.
Page 149
The attractive power of amber is mentioned by Theophrastus and Pliny, and from them by later naturalists.
Page 151
Electrified clouds passing over this would, he conceived, impart to it a portion of their electricity, which would be rendered evident to the senses by sparks being emitted when a key, the knuckle, or other conductor was presented to it.
Page 181
" The following epitaph was written by Dr.
Page 189
_ Though the Parliament may judge of the occasion, the people will think it can never exercise such right till representatives from the colonies are admitted into Parliament; and that, whenever the occasion arises, representatives _will_ be ordered.
Page 192
that the stamps should be so protected as that every one might have them.
Page 195
_ But suppose Great Britain should be engaged in a _war in Europe_, would North America contribute to the support of it? _A.