Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 81

a page for each of the
virtues. I ruled each page with red ink, so as to have seven columns,
one for each day of the week, marking each column with a letter for the
day. I crossed these columns with thirteen red lines, marking the
beginning of each line with the first letter of one of the virtues; on
which line, and in its proper column, I might mark, by a little black
spot, every fault I found upon examination to have been committed
respecting that virtue upon that day.[10]


_Form of the pages._

TEMPERANCE.
Eat not to dulness: drink not to elevation.

+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| | Sun. | M. | T. | W. | Th. | F. | S. |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| Tem. | | | | | | | |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| Sil. | * | * | | * | | * | |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| Ord. | * | * | * | | * | * | * |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| Res. | | * | | | | * | |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| Fru. | * | | | | | * | |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| Ind. | | | * | | | | |
+------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|

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Text Comparison with Experiments and Observations on Electricity Made at Philadelphia in America

Page 0
John's Gate_.
Page 4
Touch the top first, and on approaching the bottom with the other end, you have a constant stream of fire, from the wire entering the bottle.
Page 7
--If you present the point in the dark, you will see, sometimes at a foot distance, and more, a light gather upon it like that of a fire-fly or glow-worm; the less sharp the point, the nearer you must bring it to observe the light; and at whatever distance you see the light, you may draw off the electrical fire, and destroy the repellency.
Page 13
When both can be done at once, 'tis done with inconceivable quickness and violence.
Page 14
Glass, in like manner, has, within its substance, always the same quantity of electrical fire, and that a very great quantity in proportion to the mass of glass, as shall be shewn hereafter.
Page 18
But this wheel, like those driven by wind, water, or weights, moves by a foreign force, to wit, that of the bottles.
Page 20
Take a bottle in each hand, one that is electrify'd through the hook, the other through the coating: Apply the giving wire to the shot, which will electrify it _positively_, and the cork shall be repelled: Then apply the requiring wire, which will take out the spark given by the other; when the cork will return to the shot: Apply the same again, and take out another spark, so will the shot be electrify'd _negatively_; and the cork in that case shall be repelled equally as before.
Page 27
41.
Page 30
And as a spunge would receive no water, if the parts of water were not smaller than the pores of the spunge; and even then but slowly, if there were not a mutual attraction between those parts and the parts of the spunge; and would still imbibe it faster, if the mutual attraction among the parts of the water did not impede, some force being required to separate them; and fastest, if, instead of attraction, there were a mutual repulsion among those parts, which would act in conjunction with the attraction of the spunge.
Page 36
And this is constantly observable in these experiments, that the greater quantity of electricity on the pasteboard tube, the farther it strikes or discharges its fire, and the point likewise will draw it off at a still greater distance.
Page 37
I say, if these things are so, may not the knowledge of this power of points be of use to mankind, in preserving houses, churches, ships, &c.
Page 38
24.
Page 39
Sometimes the stain spreads a little wider than the breadth of the leaf, and looks brighter at the edge, as by inspecting closely you may observe in these.
Page 42
I know it is commonly thought that it easily pervades glass, and the experiment of a feather suspended by a thread in a bottle hermetically sealed, yet moved by bringing a nibbed tube near the outside of the bottle, is alledged to prove it.
Page 47
--And thus the experiment of the feather inclosed in a glass vessel hermetically sealed, but moving on the approach of the rubbed tube, is explained: When an additional quantity of the electrical fluid is applied to the side of the vessel by the atmosphere of the tube, a quantity is repelled and driven out of the inner surface of that side into the vessel, and there affects the feather, returning again into its pores, when the tube with its atmosphere is withdrawn; not that the particles of that atmosphere did themselves pass through the glass to the feather.
Page 48
I have try'd another way, which I thought more likely to obtain a mixture of the electrical and other effluvia together, if such a mixture had been possible.
Page 50
For the globe then draws the electrical fire out of the outside surface of the phial, and forces it, through the prime conductor and wire of the phial, into the inside surface.
Page 52
2.
Page 53
FOOTNOTES.
Page 54
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