Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 84

With knowledge, conscious peace, and virtue pure;
Sacred, substantial, never-fading bliss!"

The precept of _Order_, requiring that _every part of my business should
have its allotted time_, one page in my little book contained the
following scheme of employment for the twenty-four hours of a natural
day.

SCHEME.

Hours.
_Morning._ { } Rise, wash, and address _Powerful
The Question { 5} Goodness_! Contrive day's business, and
What good shall { 6} take the resolution of the day; prosecute
I do this day? { 7} the present study, and breakfast.

8}
9} Work.
10}
11}

_Noon._ {12} Read, or look over my accounts, and
{ 1} dine.

{ 2}
_Afternoon._ { 3} Work.
{ 4}

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Text Comparison with The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Page 8
He had an excellent constitution of body, was of middle stature, but well set, and very strong; he was ingenious, could draw prettily, was skilled a little in music, and had a clear pleasing voice, so that when he played psalm tunes on his violin and sung withal, as he sometimes did in an evening after the business of the day was over, it was extremely agreeable to hear.
Page 17
The only one before it was the Boston News-Letter.
Page 27
He said I appear'd a young man of promising parts, and therefore should be encouraged; the printers at Philadelphia were wretched ones; and, if I would set up there, he made no doubt I should succeed; for his part, he would procure me the public business, and do me every other service in his power.
Page 34
Keimer wore his beard at full length, because somewhere in the Mosaic law it is said, "Thou shalt not mar the corners of thy beard.
Page 40
He seem'd quite to forget his wife and child, and I, by degrees, my engagements with Miss Read, to whom I never wrote more than one letter, and that was to let her know I was not likely soon to return.
Page 53
They had me to their houses, introduced me to their friends, and show'd me much civility; while he, tho' the master, was a little neglected.
Page 54
childhood piously in the Dissenting way.
Page 58
He began his paper, however, and, after carrying it on three quarters of a year, with at most only ninety subscribers, he offered it to me for a trifle; and I, having been ready some time to go on with it, took it in hand directly; and it prov'd in a few years extremely profitable to me.
Page 60
Many of our Welsh people are going to settle in North Carolina, where land is cheap.
Page 80
And like him who, having a garden to weed, does not attempt to eradicate all the bad herbs at once, which would exceed his reach and his strength, but works on one of the beds at a time, and, having accomplish'd the first, proceeds to a second, so I should have, I hoped, the encouraging pleasure of seeing on my pages the progress I made in virtue, by clearing successively my lines of their spots, till in the end, by a number of courses, I should be happy in viewing a clean book, after a thirteen weeks' daily examination.
Page 113
The next day, sensible they had misbehav'd in giving us that disturbance, they sent three of.
Page 115
A convenient and handsome building was soon erected; the institution has by constant experience been found useful, and flourishes to this day; and I do not remember any of my political manoeuvres, the success of which gave me at the time more pleasure, or wherein, after thinking of it, I more easily excus'd myself for having made some use of cunning.
Page 127
The general eagerly laid hold of my words, and said, "Then you, sir, who are a man of interest there, can probably procure them for us; and I beg you will undertake it.
Page 131
, and readily paid my account of disbursements, thanking me repeatedly, and requesting my farther assistance in sending provisions after him.
Page 145
I once purpos'd answering the abbe, and actually began the answer; but, on consideration that my writings contain'd a description of experiments which any one might repeat and verify, and if not to be verifi'd, could not be defended; or of observations offer'd as conjectures, and not delivered dogmatically, therefore not laying me under any obligation to defend them; and reflecting that a dispute between two persons, writing in different languages, might be lengthened greatly by mistranslations, and thence misconceptions of one another's meaning, much of one of the abbe's letters being founded on an error in the translation, I concluded to let my papers shift for themselves, believing it was better to spend what time I could spare from public business in making new experiments, than in disputing about those already made.
Page 148
note.
Page 152
" While I was, as afore mention'd, detain'd at New York, I receiv'd all the accounts of the provisions, etc.
Page 153
After many conjectures respecting the cause, when we were near another ship almost as dull as ours, which, however, gain'd upon us, the captain ordered all hands to come aft, and stand as near the ensign staff as possible.
Page 154
I am persuaded, therefore, that ere long some ingenious philosopher will undertake it, to whom I wish success.
Page 163
His grave is in the churchyard at Fifth and Arch streets, Philadelphia.