Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 1

16

The Waste of Life 22

Self-denial not the Essence of Virtue 25

On the Usefulness of the Mathematics 27

The Art of procuring Pleasant Dreams 31

Advice to a young Tradesman 37

Rules of Health 39

The Ephemera; an Emblem of Human Life. To Madame
Brillon, of Passy 40

The Whistle. To Madame Brillon

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Text Comparison with The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Page 6
I have heard that he wrote sundry small occasional pieces, but only one of them was printed, which I saw now many years since.
Page 10
By my rambling digressions I perceive myself to be grown old.
Page 11
Pleased with the Pilgrim's Progress, my first collection was of John Bunyan's works in separate little volumes.
Page 14
But I found I wanted a stock of words, or a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme, would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make me master of it.
Page 18
Our disputes were often brought before our father, and I fancy I was either generally in the right, or else a better pleader, because the judgment was generally in my favor.
Page 24
He introduc'd me to his son, who receiv'd me civilly, gave me a breakfast, but told me he did not at present want a hand, being lately suppli'd with one; but there was another printer in town, lately set up,.
Page 27
I was not a little surprised, and Keimer star'd like a pig poison'd.
Page 30
While I liv'd in Boston most of my hours of leisure for conversation were spent with him, and he continu'd a sober as well as an industrious lad; was much respected for his learning by several of the clergy and other gentlemen, and seemed to promise making a good figure in.
Page 31
Collins wished to be employ'd in some counting-house, but, whether they discover'd his dramming by his breath, or by his behaviour, tho' he had some recommendations, he met with no success in any application, and continu'd lodging and boarding at the same house with me, and at my expense.
Page 32
" This was spoken with such an appearance of cordiality, that I had not the least doubt of his meaning what he said.
Page 42
This made a breach between us; and, when he returned again to London, he let me know he thought I had cancell'd all the obligations he had been under to me.
Page 76
As I knew, or thought I knew, what was right and wrong, I did not see why I might not always do the one and avoid the other.
Page 98
In 1739 arrived among us from Ireland the Reverend Mr.
Page 124
" "The governor," says I, "has not yet blacked them enough.
Page 127
The general eagerly laid hold of my words, and said, "Then you, sir, who are a man of interest there, can probably procure them for us; and I beg you will undertake it.
Page 135
They amounted to near twenty thousand pound, which to pay would have ruined me.
Page 138
Each pine made three palisades of eighteen feet long, pointed at one end.
Page 140
the office, and, with the help of a few hands to measure out the liquor, executed it to satisfaction, and never were prayers more generally and more punctually attended; so that I thought this method preferable to the punishment inflicted by some military laws for non-attendance on divine service.
Page 142
Just as I was getting on horseback they came to my door, between thirty and forty, mounted, and all in their uniforms.
Page 155
I set out immediately, with my son, for London, and we only stopt a little by the way to view Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain, and Lord Pembroke's house and gardens, with his very curious antiquities at Wilton.