Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 110

been some similarity in our fortunes and the
circumstances of our lives. This is a fresh instance, for by letters
just received I find that I was about the same time chosen President of
our American Philosophical Society, established at Philadelphia.[16]

[16] The American Philosophical Society was instituted in 1769, and
was formed by the union of two societies which had formerly
subsisted at Philadelphia, whose views and objects were of a
similar nature. Its members were classed in the following
committees:

1. Geography, Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy.

2. Medicine and Anatomy.

3. Natural History and Chymistry.

4. Trade and Commerce.

5. Mechanics and Architecture.

6. Husbandry and American Improvements.

Several volumes have been published of the transactions of this
American Society, in which are many papers by Dr. Franklin.--_Note
by Lord Kames._

"I have sent by sea, to the care of Mr. Alexander a little box
containing a few copies of the late edition of my books, for my friends
in Scotland. One is directed for you, and one for your society, which I
beg that you and they would accept as a small token of my respect.

"With the sincerest esteem and regard,
"B. FRANKLIN.

"P.S.--I am sorry my letter of 1767, concerning the American disputes,
miscarried. I now send you a copy of it from my book. The examination
mentioned in it you have probably seen. Things daily wear a worse
aspect, and tend more and more to a breach and final separation."

* * * * *

"_John Alleyne._

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 11
A.
Page 46
We landed at Philadelphia the 11th of October, where I found sundry alterations.
Page 51
The latter was a shrewd, sagacious old man, who told me that he began for himself, when young, by wheeling clay for the brickmakers, learned to write after he was of age, carried the chain for surveyors, who taught him surveying, and he had now, by his industry, acquired a good estate; and, said he, I foresee you will soon work this man out of his business, and make a fortune in it at Philadelphia.
Page 56
My friends lamented my connexion with him, but I was to make the best of it.
Page 57
No, said he, my father has really been disappointed, and is really unable; and I am unwilling to distress him farther.
Page 66
Abel James (received in Paris).
Page 70
"When we see how cruel statesmen and warriors can be to the human race, and how absurd distinguished men can be to their acquaintance, it will be instructive to observe the instances multiply of pacific, acquiescing manners; and to find how compatible it is to be great and _domestic_; enviable and yet _good-humoured_.
Page 75
" * * * * * CONTINUATION, _Begun at Passy, near Paris, 1784.
Page 78
This was the first appearance of plate and china in our house, which afterward, in a course of years, as our wealth increased, augmented gradually to several hundred pounds in value.
Page 94
I had begun in 1733 to study languages; I soon made myself so much master of the French as to be able to read the books in that language with ease.
Page 106
, one Church of England man, one Presbyterian, one Baptist, one Moravian, &c.
Page 114
Human felicity is produced, not so much by great pieces of good fortune.
Page 131
There was an art in their contrivance of those places that seems worth mentioning.
Page 150
Their apparatus was large, and by means of it they were enabled to collect large quantities of the electric fluid, and thus to produce phenomena which had been hitherto unobserved.
Page 153
When the truth of it could no longer be doubted, envy and vanity endeavoured to detract from its merit.
Page 164
These were found to be only to grant pardons upon submission.
Page 173
The simplicity of his style was well adapted to the clearness of his understanding.
Page 179
And having considered that the covering its ground-plat with buildings and pavements, which carry off most of the rain, and prevent its soaking into the earth, and renewing and purifying the springs, whence the water of the wells must gradually grow worse, and, in time, be unfit for use, as I find has happened in all old cities, I recommend that, at the end of the first hundred years, if not done before, the corporation of the city employ a part of the hundred thousand pounds in bringing by pipes the water of Wissahiccon Creek into the town, so as to supply the inhabitants, which I apprehend may be done without great difficulty, the level of that creek being much above that of the city, and may be made higher by a dam.
Page 185
They submitted willingly to the government of the crown, and paid in their courts obedience to acts of Parliament.
Page 201
John was another good old man; his son Harry helped to support him.