Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 220

a China or stone teapot, being in some degree
of the nature of glass, which is not a good conductor of heat, may have
a handle of the same stuff. Thus, also, a damp, moist air shall make a
man more sensible of cold, or chill him more than a dry air that is
colder, because a moist air is fitter to receive and conduct away the
heat of his body. This fluid, entering bodies in great quantity, first
expands them, by separating their parts a little; afterward, by farther
separating their parts, it renders solids fluid, and at length
dissipates their parts in air. Take this fluid from melted lead or from
water, the parts cohere again; the first grows solid, the latter becomes
ice: and this is sooner done by the means of good conductors. Thus, if
you take, as I have done, a square bar of lead, four inches long and
one inch thick, together with three pieces of wood planed to the same
dimensions, and lay them on a smooth board, fixed so as not to be easily
separated or moved, and pour into the cavity they form as much melted
lead as will fill it, you will see the melted lead chill and become firm
on the side next the leaden bar some time before it chills on the other
three sides in contact with the wooden bars, though, before the lead was
poured in, they might all be supposed to have the same degree of heat or
coldness, as they had been exposed in the same room to the same air. You
will likewise observe, that the leaden bar, as it has cooled the melted
lead more than the wooden bars have done, so it is itself more heated by
the melted lead. There is a certain quantity of this fluid, called fire,
in every living human body; which fluid being in due proportion, keeps
the parts of the flesh and blood at such a just distance from each
other, as that the flesh and nerves are supple, and the blood fit for
circulation. If part of this due proportion of fire be conducted away,
by means of a contact with other bodies, as air, water, or metals, the
parts of our skin and flesh that come into such contact first draw more
near together than is agreeable, and give that sensation which we call
cold; and if too much be conveyed away, the body stiffens, the blood
ceases to flow, and death ensues. On the other hand, if too much of this
fluid be communicated

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 11
_ _Page.
Page 33
FOOTNOTE: [6] Perkins.
Page 36
It may not be amiss to consider the places where they happen most.
Page 44
That power by which the air expands itself, you attribute to a mutual repelling power in the particles which compose the air, by which they are separated from each.
Page 77
Now this motion of the water, occasioned only by its gravity, or tendency to run from a higher place to a lower, is by no means so swift as the motion of the wave.
Page 87
would make 3 or 4 bodies equal to once _a_, each of which would require once the first force to be moved with the celerity _c_.
Page 100
It seems then, that each beginning drop, and particle of hail, receives continual addition in its progress downwards.
Page 117
I would wish you to communicate this to your ingenious friend, Mr.
Page 153
| | | | |Oct 29, 1776 | | Nov | | | | | | | | | | | | 1| 10 | | | 78 |WSW | E½N | 109 |No ob|68 12| | | --| | 4 | 71 | 81 | | | | | | | | 2| 8 | | 71 | 75 | N | | | | |Some sparks in | | --| 12 | | | 78 | | | 141 |ditto|65 23|the water these| | --| | 4 | 67 | 76 | | | | | |two last nights| | 3| 8 | | | 76 | NW | ESE½E| | | | | | --| 12 | | | 76 | | EbS | 160 |37 0|62 7| .
Page 159
| | 17 | 8 | | | 63 |ESE |N 19 E| 56 |44 15|34 25| | | 18 | all day | | 65 |SbW |N 75 E| 210 |45 6|29 43|Some gulph weed| | 19 | |Noon| 65 | 64 |S W |N 80 E| 238 |45 46|24 2| | | 20 | 8 | | | 62 | N |S 80 E| 155 |45 19|20 30| | | -- | | 4 | | 60 | | | | | | | | 21 | 9 | | | 62 | S |N 88 E| 94 |45 22|18 17| | | 22 | 10 | | 60 | 62 |SSW |S 89 E| 133 |45 19|15 19| | | 23 | |Noon| | 61 |WSW |S 86 E| 194 |45 6|10 35| | | 24 | | do.
Page 160
| | | | | | | |Needle| | | | | | | | | | | |Miles.
Page 169
I will, however, take this opportunity of repeating, those particulars to you, which I mentioned in our last conversation, as, by perusing them at your leisure, you may possibly imprint them so in your memory as on occasion to be of some use to you.
Page 170
The specific gravity of some human bodies, in comparison to that of water, has been examined by Mr.
Page 171
When he is seized with the cramp in the leg, the method of driving it away is to give to the parts affected a sudden, vigorous and violent shock; which he may do in the air as he swims on his back.
Page 206
I have been the more particular in explaining these first principles, because, for want of clear ideas respecting them, much fruitless expence has been occasioned; not only single chimneys, but in some instances, within my knowledge, whole stacks having been pulled down and rebuilt with funnels of different forms, imagined more powerful in _drawing_ smoke; but having still the same height and the same opening below, have performed no better than their predecessors.
Page 214
Raising your funnels, if practicable, so as their tops may be higher, or at least equal with the commanding eminence, is more to be depended on.
Page 250
Carpets prevent the coldness of stone or brick floors offending the feet in winter, and the noise of treading on such floors, overhead, is less inconvenient than on boards.
Page 347
This five hundredth part of the citizens have the privilege.
Page 359
113.
Page 367
_Folger_, family-name of Franklin's mother, i.