Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 41

my eager pursuits, no solid pleasures now remain but
the reflection of a long life spent in meaning well, the sensible
conversation of a few good lady ephemerae, and now and then a kind smile
and a tune from the ever amiable _Brillante_.

* * * * *

THE WHISTLE.

TO MADAME BRILLON.

Passy, November 10, 1779.

* * * * * I am charmed with your description of Paradise, and with your
plan of living there; and I approve much of your conclusion, that, in
the mean time, we should draw all the good we can from this world. In my
opinion, we might all draw more good from it than we do, and suffer less
evil, if we would take care not to give too much for _whistles_ For to
me it seems that most of the unhappy people we meet with are become so
by neglect of that caution.

You ask what I mean? You love stories, and will excuse my telling one of
myself.

When I was a child of seven years old, my friends, on a holyday, filled
my pocket with coppers. I went directly to a shop where they sold toys
for children; and, being charmed with the sound of a _whistle_ that I
met by the way in the hands of another boy, I voluntarily offered and
gave all my money for one. I then came home and went whistling all over
the house, much pleased with my _whistle_, but disturbing all the
family. My brothers, and sisters, and cousins, understanding the bargain
I had made, told me I had given four times as much for it as it was
worth; put me in mind of what good things I might have bought with the
rest of the money; and laughed at me so much for my folly, that I cried
with vexation; and the reflection gave me more chagrin than the
_whistle_ gave me pleasure.

This, however, was afterward of use to me, the impression continuing on
my mind; so that often, when I was tempted to buy some unnecessary
thing, I said to myself, _Don't give too much for

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 1 of 2] With His Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 2
Page Life of Dr.
Page 23
Man is sometimes more generous when he has little money than when he has plenty; perhaps to prevent his being thought to have but little.
Page 41
, if ever I stepped out of the room, and all ascribed to the _chapel ghost_, which they said ever haunted those not regularly admitted, that, notwithstanding the master's protection, I found myself obliged to comply and pay the money, convinced of the folly of being on ill terms with those one is to live with continually.
Page 48
He grew by degrees less civil, put on more the.
Page 49
He had conceived a great regard for me, and was very unwilling that I should leave the house while he remained in it.
Page 74
I am sure, however, that the life, and the treatise I allude to (on the _Art of Virtue_), will necessarily fulfil the chief of my expectations; and still more so if you take up the measure of suiting these performances to the several views above stated.
Page 85
After a while I went through one course only in a year; and afterward only one in several years; till at length I omitted them entirely, being employed.
Page 88
I made it a rule to forbear all direct contradiction to the sentiments of others, and all positive assertion of mine own.
Page 114
And here let me remark the convenience of having but one gutter in such a narrow street, running down its middle, instead of two, one on each side, near the footway.
Page 137
Afterward, having been assured that there really existed such a person as Franklin at Philadelphia (which he had doubted), he wrote and published a volume of letters, chiefly addressed to me, defending his theory, and denying the verity of my experiments, and of the positions deduced from them.
Page 145
No one of these has the advantage of knowing all the ideas and experience of the others, and, therefore, cannot draw just conclusions from a combination of the whole.
Page 158
On his passage he observed the singular effect produced by the agitation of a vessel containing oil floating on water.
Page 160
It was, however, published in the papers, and produced a spirited reply from him, just before his departure for England.
Page 166
Two or three essays read in this society were published.
Page 181
As Dr.
Page 190
_ Suppose an act of internal regulations connected with a tax, how would they receive it? _A.
Page 197
_The colonies_ are not supposed to be within the realm; they have assemblies of their own, which are their parliaments, and they are, in that respect, in the same situation with Ireland.
Page 201
It has never been violated, on their part or ours, till now.
Page 204
I will endeavour to show, by a few examples from books and history, the sense those people have had of such actions.
Page 213
Turks to Scripture Christians! They would have been safer, though they had been taken in actual war against the Saracens, if they had once drank water with them.