The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 20

by good people as an
infidel or atheist. I determin'd on the point, but my father now
siding with my brother, I was sensible that, if I attempted to go
openly, means would be used to prevent me. My friend Collins,
therefore, undertook to manage a little for me. He agreed with the
captain of a New York sloop for my passage, under the notion of my
being a young acquaintance of his, that had got a naughty girl with
child, whose friends would compel me to marry her, and therefore I
could not appear or come away publicly. So I sold some of my books to
raise a little money, was taken on board privately, and as we had a
fair wind, in three days I found myself in New York, near 300 miles
from home, a boy of but 17, without the least recommendation to, or
knowledge of any person in the place, and with very little money in my
pocket.

My inclinations for the sea were by this time worne out, or I might now
have gratify'd them. But, having a trade, and supposing myself a
pretty good workman, I offer'd my service to the printer in the place,
old Mr. William Bradford, who had been the first printer in
Pennsylvania, but removed from thence upon the quarrel of George Keith.
He could give me no employment, having little to do, and help enough
already; but says he, "My son at Philadelphia has lately lost his
principal hand, Aquila Rose, by death; if you go thither, I believe he
may employ you." Philadelphia was a hundred miles further; I set out,
however, in a boat for Amboy, leaving my chest and things to follow me
round by sea.

In crossing the bay, we met with a squall that tore our rotten sails to
pieces, prevented our getting into the Kill and drove us upon Long
Island. In our way, a drunken Dutchman, who was a passenger too, fell
overboard; when he was sinking, I reached through the water to his
shock pate, and drew him up, so that we got him in again. His ducking
sobered him a little, and he went to sleep, taking first out of his
pocket a book, which he desir'd I would dry for him. It proved to be
my old favorite author, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, in Dutch, finely
printed on good paper, with copper cuts, a dress better than I had ever
seen it wear in its own language. I have since found that it

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Text Comparison with Franklin's Autobiography (Eclectic English Classics)

Page 0
The one had not yet written "Gulliver's Travels," nor the other "Robinson Crusoe;" neither had Addison and Steele and other wits of Anne's reign begun the "Spectator.
Page 22
He agreed with the captain of a New York sloop for my passage, under the notion of my being a young acquaintance of his that had got into trouble, and therefore I could not appear or come away publicly.
Page 23
] [Footnote 15: Franklin was born Sunday, Jan.
Page 25
He could give me no employment, having little to do and help enough already; but says he, "My son at Philadelphia has lately lost his principal hand, Aquila Rose, by death; if you go thither I believe he may employ you.
Page 32
[50] On my doubting whether my father would assist me in it, Sir William said he would give me a letter to him, in which he would state the advantages, and he did not doubt of prevailing with him.
Page 41
But he never fulfilled his promise.
Page 50
She was cheerful and polite, and conversed pleasantly.
Page 53
] [Footnote 79: Pay.
Page 81
To this end I formed the following little prayer, which was prefixed to my tables of examination, for daily use: "O powerful Goodness! bountiful Father! merciful Guide! Increase in me that wisdom which discovers my truest interest.
Page 90
In 1732 I first published my Almanac,[117] under the name of "Richard Saunders;" it was continued by me about twenty-five years, and commonly called "Poor Richard's Almanac.
Page 113
David Hall, with whose character I was well acquainted, as he had worked for me four years.
Page 114
I would not, however, insinuate that my ambition was not flattered by all these promotions.
Page 121
in three hours, a strong, active man might have done it in half the time.
Page 122
Some of these were inevitably at first expensive, so that in.
Page 127
] [Footnote 146: Little channel or gutter.
Page 130
That the pay commence from the time of their joining the forces at Will's Creek, which must be on or before the 20th of May ensuing, and that a reasonable allowance be paid over and above for the time necessary for their traveling to Will's Creek and home again after their discharge.
Page 134
These twenty parcels, well packed, were placed on as many horses, each parcel, with the horse, being intended as a present for one officer.
Page 156
There was a great company of officers, citizens, and strangers, and, some chairs having been borrowed in the neighborhood, there was one among them very low, which fell to the lot of Mr.
Page 173
To whom thy secret thou dost tell, To him thy freedom thou dost sell.
Page 175
=132.