The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 4

too old to follow business longer,
when he went to live with his son John, a dyer at Banbury, in
Oxfordshire, with whom my father served an apprenticeship. There my
grandfather died and lies buried. We saw his gravestone in 1758. His
eldest son Thomas lived in the house at Ecton, and left it with the
land to his only child, a daughter, who, with her husband, one Fisher,
of Wellingborough, sold it to Mr. Isted, now lord of the manor there.
My grandfather had four sons that grew up, viz.: Thomas, John, Benjamin
and Josiah. I will give you what account I can of them, at this
distance from my papers, and if these are not lost in my absence, you
will among them find many more particulars.

Thomas was bred a smith under his father; but, being ingenious, and
encouraged in learning (as all my brothers were) by an Esquire Palmer,
then the principal gentleman in that parish, he qualified himself for
the business of scrivener; became a considerable man in the county; was
a chief mover of all public-spirited undertakings for the county or
town of Northampton, and his own village, of which many instances were
related of him; and much taken notice of and patronized by the then
Lord Halifax. He died in 1702, January 6, old style, just four years
to a day before I was born. The account we received of his life and
character from some old people at Ecton, I remember, struck you as
something extraordinary, from its similarity to what you knew of mine.

"Had he died on the same day," you said, "one might have supposed a
transmigration."

John was bred a dyer, I believe of woolens. Benjamin was bred a silk
dyer, serving an apprenticeship at London. He was an ingenious man. I
remember him well, for when I was a boy he came over to my father in
Boston, and lived in the house with us some years. He lived to a great
age. His grandson, Samuel Franklin, now lives in Boston. He left
behind him two quarto volumes, MS., of his own poetry, consisting of
little occasional pieces addressed to his friends and relations, of
which the following, sent to me, is a specimen.[2] He had formed a
short-hand of his own, which he taught me, but, never practising it, I
have now forgot it. I was named after this uncle, there being a
particular affection between him and my father. He was very pious, a
great attender

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Text Comparison with Benjamin Franklin Representative selections, with introduction, bibliograpy, and notes

Page 15
412 The Lord's Prayer (1779?), 414 The Levee (1779?), 417 Proposed New Version of the Bible (1779?), 419 To Joseph Priestley (February 8, 1780), 420 To George Washington (March 5, 1780), 421 To Miss Georgiana Shipley (October 8, 1780), 422 To Richard Price (October 9, 1780), 423 Dialogue between Franklin and the Gout (1780), 424 The Handsome and Deformed Leg (1780?), 430 To Miss Georgiana Shipley (undated), 432 To David Hartley (December 15, 1781), .
Page 32
.
Page 167
--At his Table he lik'd to have as often as he.
Page 209
--I objected my Want of Money.
Page 230
{12} Read, or overlook my accounts, { 1} and dine.
Page 292
A mixture of Innocence and Wisdom makes him ever seriously chearful.
Page 312
per Book, in less than a Twelvemonth; when a small Quantity of David's Psalms (an excellent Version) have lain upon my Hands above twice the Time.
Page 415
| M.
Page 427
48 | 3 | 7 | | 19 | 9 31 | 1 42 | 4 | 8 | | 20 | 10 14 | 2 30 | 5 | 9 | | 21 | 10 51 | 3 19 | 6 | 10 | | 22 | 11 29 | 4 6 | 7 | 11 | | 23 | 12 0 | 4 53 | 7 | 12 | | 24 | Morn | 5 36 | 8 | 13 | | 25 | 0 27 | 6 19 | 9 | 14 | | 26 | 0 56 | 7 2 | 10 | 15 | | 27 | 1 27 | 7 45 | 10 | 16 | | 28 | 1 58 | 8 32 | 11 | 17 | | 29 | 2 30 | 9 20 | 12 | 18 | | 30 | 3 8 | 10 13 | 1 | 19 | | 31 | Moon | 11 6 | 2 |.
Page 452
= | 5 11 | 6 49 | | 16 | 5 | _rain;_ | 5 13 | 6 47 | | 17 | 6 |Days dec.
Page 471
57 | 4 | 3 | | 15 | 7 39 | 1 43 | 4 | 4 | | 16 | 8 14 | 2 30 | 5 | 5 | | 17 | 8 57 | 3 22 | 6 | 6 | | 18 | 9 43 | 4 14 | 7 | 7 | | 19 | 10 37 | 5 8 | 8 | 8 | | 20 | 11 39 | 6 2 | 9 | 9 | | 21 | 12 41 | 6 59 | 9 | 10 | | 22 | M.
Page 506
The Third Eclipse will be of the _Moon_, on _Friday_, the 12th Day of _October_, in the Morning, when, if the Air be clear, the Moon will be seen eclipsed almost six Digits; it begins at 26 min.
Page 532
If I could conjure, it should be to know what was that _oddest question about me that ever was thought of_, which you tell me a lady had just sent to ask you.
Page 573
Spectator of Pimlico, give me leave to instance the various numberless Accounts the Newswriters have.
Page 588
There is no gradual Diminution of the Colour, from the full Bloom in the Middle of the Cheek to the faint Tint near the Sides, nor does it show itself differently in different Faces.
Page 607
FRANKLIN [No date.
Page 620
You ministers know, that much of the strength of government depends on the _opinion_ of the people; and much of that opinion on the _choice of rulers_ placed immediately over them.
Page 745
Thus, tho' Corah's real Motive was the Supplanting of Aaron, he persuaded the People that he meant only the _Public Good_, and they, moved by his Insinuations, began to cry out, 'Let us maintain the Common Liberty of our _respective Tribes_; we have freed ourselves from the Slavery impos'd on us by the Egyptians, and shall we now suffer ourselves to be made Slaves by Moses? If we must have a Master, it were better to return to Pharaoh, who at least fed us with Bread and Onions, than to serve this new Tyrant, who by his Operations has brought us into Danger of Famine.
Page 759
I have therefore no doubt, but this wise Council will prefer the Comfort and Happiness of a whole Nation of true Believers to the Whim of a few _Erika_, and dismiss their Petition.
Page 777
Wm.