The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 1 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 0

TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE

This is Volume 1 of a 3-volume set. The other two volumes are also
accessible in Project Gutenberg using
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48137 and
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48138.

Italic text is denoted by _underscores_.

Obvious typographical errors and punctuation errors have been
corrected after careful comparison with other occurrences within
the text and consultation of external sources.

More detail can be found at the end of the book.




[Illustration: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, L.L.D.

_Publish'd April 1, 1806; by Longman, Rees, Hurst, & Orme,
Paternoster Row._]




The
WORKS
Of
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, L.L.D.

VOL. 1.

[Illustration: (Engraved by W. & G. Cooke.)]


PRINTED,

for Longman, Hurst, Rees, & Orme, Paternoster Row, London.




THE
COMPLETE
WORKS,
IN
PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, AND MORALS,
OF THE LATE
DR. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,
NOW FIRST COLLECTED AND ARRANGED:
WITH
MEMOIRS OF HIS EARLY LIFE,
WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

London:

PRINTED FOR J. JOHNSON, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH-YARD;
AND LONGMAN, HURST, REES AND ORME,
PATERNOSTER-ROW.

1806.




ADVERTISEMENT.


_The works of Dr. Franklin have been often partially collected, never
before brought together in one uniform publication._

_The first collection was made by Mr. Peter Collinson in the year
1751. It consisted of letters, communicated by the author to the
editor, on one subject, electricity, and formed a pamphlet only,
of which the price was half-a-crown. It was enlarged in 1752, by a
second communication on the same subject, and in 1754, by a third,
till, in 1766, by the addition of letters and papers on other
philosophical subjects, it amounted to a quarto volume of 500 pages._

_Ten years after, in 1779, another collection was made, by a
different editor, in one volume, printed both in quarto and octavo,
of papers not contained in the preceding collection, under the title
of Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces._

_In 1787, a third collection appeared in a thin octavo volume,
entitled Philosophical and Miscellaneous Papers._

_And lastly, in 1793, a fourth was published, in two volumes,
crown octavo, consisting of Memoirs of Dr. Franklin's Life, and
Essays humourous, moral and literary, chiefly in the Manner of the
Spectator._

_In the present volumes will be found all the different collections
we have enumerated, together with the various papers of the same
author, that have been published in separate pamphlets, or inserted
in foreign collections of his works, or in the Transactions of our
own

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 34
_ [8] I suppose shingles, staves, timber, and other lumber, might be lying in quantities on the wharf, for sale, as brought from the northern colonies.
Page 65
This, indeed, I have not tried, but I should guess it would rather be driven off through the vessel, especially if the vessel be metal, as being a better conductor than air; and so one should find the bason warmer after such mixture.
Page 131
Islands of ice are frequently seen off the banks of Newfoundland, by ships going between North-America and Europe.
Page 150
| 65 | 65 | S | | 25 | | |Much light.
Page 161
} | | | 31 | | | 60| 58 | 62| 62 | | | | | | |Aug | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 |49 15 | 4 15| 63| 62 | 60| 64 |East |SW ½W | 60 |22° 0 | | | 2 |48 28 | 8 58| 64| 64 | 64| 63 |E S E|WbS ½S| 174 | | | | 3 |47 0 |12 13| 60| 67 | omitted |N E |SW bW | 160 | | | | 4 |45 0 |15 43| 66| 66 |do.
Page 185
5.
Page 206
Now if smoke cannot rise but as connected with rarefied air, and a column of such air, suppose it filling the funnel, cannot rise, unless other air be admitted to supply its place; and if, therefore, no current of air enter the opening of the chimney, there is nothing to prevent the smoke coming out into the room.
Page 215
This happens more certainly when the door is shutting, for then the force of the current is augmented, and becomes very inconvenient to those who, warming themselves by the fire, happen to sit in its way.
Page 219
wonderfully: your people are very ingenious in the management of fire; but they may still learn something in that art from the Chinese[56], whose country being greatly populous and fully cultivated, has little room left for the growth of wood, and having not much other fuel that is good, have been forced upon many inventions during a course of ages, for making a little fire go as far as possible.
Page 223
The grate consists of semicircular bars, their upper bar of the greatest diameter, the others under it smaller and smaller, so that it has the appearance of half a round basket.
Page 231
II.
Page 249
Pope's rule To speak, though sure, with seeming diffidence, is therefore a good one; and if I had ever seen in your conversation the least deviation from it, I should earnestly recommend it to your observation.
Page 283
B.
Page 298
15.
Page 318
And then, having yourselves thus lessened our encouragement for raising sheep, you curse us for the scarcity of mutton! I have heard my grandfather say, that the farmers submitted to the prohibition on the exportation of wool, being made to expect and believe, that when the manufacturer bought his wool cheaper, they should also have their cloth cheaper.
Page 351
207.
Page 366
416.
Page 367
_Foster_, judge, notes on his argument for the impress of seamen, ii.
Page 369
_Gold_ and silver, remarks on exportation of, ii.
Page 391
_Whirlwinds_, how formed, ii.