The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 1 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 113

FRANKLIN_,

PRINTER.

(LIKE THE COVER OF AN OLD BOOK,

ITS CONTENTS TORN OUT,

AND STRIPT OF ITS LETTERING AND GILDING)

LIES HERE FOOD FOR WORMS;

YET THE WORK ITSELF SHALL NOT BE LOST,

FOR IT WILL (AS HE BELIEVED) APPEAR ONCE MORE

IN A NEW

AND MORE BEAUTIFUL EDITION

CORRECTED AND AMENDED

BY

THE AUTHOR.[14]




_EXTRACTS_

FROM THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF

DR. FRANKLIN.

With regard to my books, those I had in France, and those I left in
Philadelphia, being now assembled together here, and a catalogue made
of them, it is my intention to dispose of the same as follows:

My "History of the Academy of Sciences," in sixty or seventy volumes
quarto, I give to the philosophical society of Philadelphia, of which
I have the honour to be president. My collection in folio of "_Les
Arts et les Metiers_," I give to the American philosophical society,
established in New England, of which I am a member. My quarto edition
of the same, "_Arts et Metiers_," I give to the library company
of Philadelphia. Such and so many of my books as I shall mark, in
the said catalogue, with the name of my grandson Benjamin Franklin
Bache, I do hereby give to him: and such and so many of my books,
as I shall mark in the said catalogue with the name of my grandson
William Bache, I do hereby give to him: and such as shall be marked
with the name of Jonathan Williams, I hereby give to my cousin of
that name. The residue and remainder of all my books, manuscripts,
and papers, I do give to my grandson William Temple Franklin. My
share in the library company of Philadelphia I give to my grandson
Benjamin Franklin Bache, confiding that he will permit his brothers
and sisters to share in the use of it.

I was born in Boston, New England, and owe my first instructions in
literature to the free grammar-schools established there. I therefore
give one hundred pounds sterling to my executors, to be by them,
the survivors or survivor of them, paid over to the managers or
directors of the free-schools in my native town of Boston, to be by
them, or the person or persons who shall have the superintendance
and management of the said schools, put out to interest, and so
continued at interest for ever; which interest annually shall be
laid out in silver medals, and given as honorary rewards annually
by the directors of the said free-schools, for

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Text Comparison with Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Page 15
A dealer in old books met with them, and knowing me by my sometimes buying of him, he brought them to me.
Page 16
I have heard that he wrote sundry small occasional pieces, but only one of them was printed, which I saw now many years since.
Page 19
This has been a convenience to me in traveling, where my companions have been sometimes very unhappy for want of a suitable gratification of their more delicate, because better instructed, tastes and appetites.
Page 22
My father's little library consisted chiefly of books in polemic divinity, most of which I read, and have since often regretted that, at a time when I had such a thirst for knowledge, more proper books had not fallen in my way, since it was now resolved I should not be a clergyman.
Page 23
They were wretched stuff, in the Grub-street-ballad style;[17] and when they were printed he sent me about the town to sell them.
Page 26
[20] [19] John Locke (1632-1704), a celebrated English philosopher, founder of the so-called "common-sense" school of philosophers.
Page 47
But, as I may not have occasion again to mention the other two, I shall just remark here, that Watson died in my arms a few years after, much lamented, being.
Page 50
" [Illustration: "So, putting the letter into my hand"] We both of us happen'd to know, as well as the stationer, that Riddlesden, the attorney, was a very knave.
Page 54
III, Epist.
Page 69
George Webb, who had found a female friend that lent him wherewith to purchase his time of Keimer, now came to offer himself as a journeyman to us.
Page 71
I told them I could not propose a separation while any prospect remain'd of the Meredith's fulfilling their part of our agreement, because I thought myself under great obligations to them for what they had done, and would do if they could; but, if they finally fail'd in their performance, and our partnership must be dissolv'd, I should then think myself at liberty to accept the assistance of my friends.
Page 105
We are told that it is proper to begin first with the Latin, and, having acquir'd that, it will be more easy to attain those modern languages which are deriv'd from it; and yet we do not begin with the Greek, in order more easily to acquire the Latin.
Page 123
--Smyth.
Page 128
Gilbert Tennent[89], came to me with a request that I would assist him in procuring a subscription for erecting a new meeting-house.
Page 155
He would, therefore, sometimes call in a friendly way to advise with me on difficult points, and sometimes, tho' not often, take my advice.
Page 158
Dalibard and De Lor at Marly, for drawing lightning from the clouds.
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Perceiving it as I sat by him, I said, "They have given you, sir, too low a seat.
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Page 175
What though you have found no Treasure, nor has any rich Relation left you a Legacy, _Diligence is the Mother of Good-luck_, as _Poor Richard_ says, _and God gives all Things to Industry_.
Page 185
Bibles, Testaments, Psalters, Psalm-Books, Accompt-Books, Bills of Lading bound and unbound, Common Blank Bonds for Money, Bonds with Judgment, Counterbonds, Arbitration Bonds, Arbitration Bonds with Umpirage, Bail Bonds, Counterbonds to save Bail harmless, Bills of Sale, Powers of Attorney, Writs, Summons, Apprentices Indentures, Servants Indentures, Penal Bills, Promisory Notes, &c.