The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 1 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 292

a été le premier
qui a fait l'expérience & l'a répétée, plusieurs fois; ce n'est
qu'à l'occasion de ce qu'il a vu qu'il m'a envoyé prier de venir.
S'il étoit besoin d'autres témoins que de lui & de moi, vous les
trouveriez. Coiffier presse pour partir._

_Je suis avec une respectueuse considération, Monsieur, votre, &c.
signé_ RAULET, _Prieur de Marly. 10 Mai, 1752._


"On voit, par le détail de cette lettre, que le fait est assez bien
constaté pour ne laisser aucun doute à ce sujet. Le porteur m'a
assuré de vive voix qu'il avoit tiré pendant près d'un quart-d'heure
avant que M. le Prieur arrivât, en présence de cinq ou six
personnes, des étincelles plus fortes & plus bruyantes que celles
dont il est parlé dans la lettre. Ces premieres personnes arrivant
successivement, n'osient approcher qu'à 10 ou 12 pas de la machine; &
à cette distance, malgré le plein soleil, ils voyoient les étincelles
& entendoient le bruit....

"Il résulte de toutes les expériences & observations que j'ai
rapportées dans ce mémoire, & surtout de la dernière expérience faite
à Marly-la-ville, que la matiere du tonnerre est incontestablement la
même que celle de l'électricité. L'idée qu'en a eu M. Franklin cesse
d'être une conjecture: la voilà devenue une réalité, & j'ose croire
que plus on approfondira tout ce qu'il a publié sur l'électricité,
plus on reconnoîtra combien la physique lui est redevable pour cette
partie."




_Letter of Mr. W. Watson, F. R. S. to the Royal Society, concerning
the electrical Experiments in England upon Thunder-Clouds._

Read Dec. 1752. Trans. Vol. XLVII.


GENTLEMEN,

After the communications, which we have received from several of our
correspondents in different parts of the continent, acquainting us
with the success of their experiments last summer, in endeavouring to
extract the electricity from the atmosphere during a thunder-storm,
in consequence of Mr. Franklin's hypothesis, it may be thought
extraordinary, that no accounts have been yet laid before you, of our
success here from the same experiments. That no want of attention,
therefore, may be attributed to those here, who have been hitherto
conversant in these enquiries, I thought proper to apprise you, that,
though several members of the Royal Society, as well as myself, did,
upon the first advices from France, prepare and set up the necessary
apparatus for this purpose, we were defeated in our expectations,
from the uncommon coolness and dampness of the air here, during the
whole summer. We had only at London one thunder-storm; viz. on July
20; and then the thunder was accompanied with rain; so that, by
wetting the apparatus, the electricity was

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Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 12
Franklin 285 WRITINGS OF FRANKLIN * * * * * ESSAYS, HUMOROUS, MORAL, ECONOMICAL, AND.
Page 27
end of its creation better than I.
Page 28
If it were said that he who cannot deny himself anything he inclines to, though he knows it will be to his hurt, has not the virtue of resolution or fortitude, it would be intelligible enough; but, as it stands, it seems obscure or erroneous.
Page 33
Indeed, as there is a difference in constitutions, some rest well after these meals; it costs them only a frightful dream and an apoplexy, after which they sleep till doomsday.
Page 38
AN OLD TRADESMAN.
Page 60
They therefore deferred their answer till the day following, when their speaker began by expressing their deep sense of the kindness of the Virginia government in making them that offer; "for we know," says he, "that you highly esteem the kind of learning taught in those colleges, and that the maintenance of our young men, while with you, would be very expensive to you.
Page 67
, divinity, law, and physic, were, for no other offence than writing on controverted points of church government, exposed on public scaffolds, and stigmatized and mutilated as common signal rogues or the most ordinary malefactors.
Page 68
Addison_ soon rescued the stage from the load of impurity it laboured under with an inimitable address, they strongly recommended to our imitation the most amiable, rational manly characters; and this with so much success that I cannot suppose there is any reader to-day conversant in the writings of those gentlemen, that can taste with any tolerable relish the comedies of the once admired _Shadwell_.
Page 77
There is a much better contrivance than this of the philosopher, which is, to cover the walls of the house with paper; this is generally done, and though it cannot abolish, it at least shortens the period of female dominion.
Page 97
If I wanted one to-morrow, knowing his goodness, old as he is, I should freely give more than twice the money for him; but you did the best you could, and I will take of Benny no more than he produced.
Page 103
You have kindly relieved me from the pain I had long been under.
Page 120
Pray learn, if you have not already learned,.
Page 121
Heathcoat; for, though I have not the honour of knowing them, yet as you say they are friends to the American cause, I am sure they must be women of good understanding.
Page 141
Do you possess it? If you do, and I were twenty years younger, I would give your father one thousand guineas for you.
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" * * * * * "_Dr.
Page 155
You see I have some reason to wish that, in a future state, I may not only be _as well as I was_, but a little better.
Page 199
the room and the bedding, when it can go through a continued better conductor, the wall.
Page 235
And the following are the results: Water 1-1/2 inches deep.
Page 241
There are few, though convinced, that know how to give up even an error they have been once engaged in maintaining; there is, therefore, the more merit in dropping a contest where one thinks one's self right; it is at least respectful to those we converse with.
Page 243
"In this truly great man everything seemed to concur that goes towards the constitution of exalted merit.