The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 1 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 333

offices of, i. 102, 127.

_Potts_, Stephen, a companion of Franklin's, i. 72, 84.

_Poultry_, not good at sea, ii. 193.

_Powder-magazines_, how secured from lightning, i. 375.

_Power_ to move a heavy body, how to be augmented, ii. 191.

_Pownall_, governor, memorial of, to the Duke of Cumberland, iii. 41.
letter from, on an equal communication of rights to America, 243.
constitution of the colonies by, 299.

_Preface_ to Mr. Galloway's speech, iii. 163.
to proceedings of the inhabitants of Boston, 317.

_Presbyterianism_, established religion in New England, ii. 454.

_Press_, account of the court of, ii. 463.
liberty of, abused, 465.

_Pressing_ of seamen, animadversions on, ii. 437.

_Price_, Dr. letter from, on Franklin's death, iii. 541.

_Priestley_, Dr. letter from, on Franklin's character, iii. 547.

_Printers_ at Philadelphia before Franklin, i. 36.

_Printing_, Franklin apprenticed to the business of, i. 15.
works at it as a journeymen in England, 58, 62.
in America, 35, 71.
enters on the business of, as master, 78.
observations on fashions in, ii. 355.

_Prison_, society for relieving the misery of, i. 151.
not known among the Indians of America, iii. 220.

_Privateering_, reprobated, ii. 436.
further observations on, 446.
article to prevent it, recommended in national treaties, 448.
inserted in a treaty between America and Prussia, 449.

_Proas_, of the pacific ocean, safety of, ii. 173.
flying, superior to any of our sailing boats, 176.

_Produce_ of the inland parts of America, iii. 119.

_Products_ of America, do not interfere with those of Britain, iii. 124.

_Prose-writing_, method of acquiring excellence in, i. 18.

_Protest_ against Franklin's appointment as colonial agent, remarks on,
iii. 203.

_Provisions_, cheapness of, encourages idleness, ii. 415.

_Prussian_ edict, assuming claims over Britain, iii. 311.

_Public_ services and functions of Franklin,

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Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

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_ FRONTISPIECE.
Page 1
& T.
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We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes the commissioners cannot ease or deliver us by allowing an abatement.
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"He that hath a trade, hath an estate; and he that hath a calling, hath an office of profit and honour," as Poor Richard says; but then the trade must be worked at, and the calling well followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes.
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It is true, there is much to be done, and, perhaps, you are weak-handed: but stick to it steadily, and you will see great effects; for "Constant dropping wears away stones; and by diligence and patience the mouse ate in two the cable; and little strokes fell great oaks.
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A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost; for want of a shoe the horse was lost; and for want of a horse the rider was lost;" being overtaken and slain by the enemy; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe nail.
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" Again, "It is foolish to lay out money in a purchase of repentance;" and yet this folly is practised every day at auctions, for want of minding the Almanack.
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But, ah! think what you do when you run in debt; you give to another power over your liberty, If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him; you will make poor pitiful sneaking excuses, and, by degrees, come to lose your veracity, and sink into base, downright lying; for, "The second vice is lying, the first is running in debt," as Poor Richard says; and again, to the same purpose, "Lying rides upon Debt's back:" whereas a free-born Englishman ought not to be ashamed nor afraid to see or speak to any man living.
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" At present, perhaps, you may think yourselves in thriving circumstances, and that you can bear a little extravagance without injury; but "For age and want save while you may, No morning sun lasts a whole day.
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Darton, Printers, Holborn-Hill, London.