The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 114

when large
sometimes break above and pour over it, doing great damage.

That this effect might in any degree be prevented, or the height
and violence of waves in the sea moderated, we had no certain
account; Pliny's authority for the practice of seamen in his time
being slighted. But discoursing lately on this subject with his
excellency Count Bentinck, of Holland, his son the honourable Captain
Bentinck, and the learned professor Allemand (to all whom I showed
the experiment of smoothing in a windy day the large piece of water
at the head of the Green Park) a letter was mentioned, which had
been received by the Count from Batavia, relative to the saving of a
Dutch ship in a storm by pouring oil into the sea. I much desired to
see that letter, and a copy of it was promised me, which I afterward
received.

FOOTNOTES:

[28] Note by Dr. Brownrigg.

Sir Gilfred Lawson, who served long in the army at Gibraltar,
assures me, that the fishermen in that place are accustomed to pour
a little oil on the sea, in order to still its motion, that they may
be enabled to see the oysters lying at its bottom; which are there
very large, and which they take up with a proper instrument. This
Sir Gilfred had often seen there performed, and said the same was
practised on other parts of the Spanish coast.

[29] See the preceding paper. _Editor._




_Extract of a Letter from Mr. Tengnagel to Count Bentinck, dated at
Batavia, the 5th of January, 1770._

"Near the islands Paul and Amsterdam, we met with a storm, which had
nothing particular in it worthy of being communicated to you, except
that the captain found himself obliged for greater safety in wearing
the ship, to pour oil into the sea, to prevent the waves breaking
over her, which had an excellent effect, and succeeded in preserving
us. As he poured out but a little at a time, the East India Company
owes perhaps its ship to only six demi-ames of oil-olive. I was
present upon deck when this was done; and I should not have mentioned
this circumstance to you, but that we have found people here so
prejudiced against the experiment, as to make it necessary for the
officers on board and myself to give a certificate of the truth on
this head, of which we made no difficulty."

On this occasion, I mentioned to Captain Bentinck, a thought
which had occurred to me in reading the voyages of our late
circumnavigators, particularly where accounts are given of pleasant
and fertile islands which they much desired to

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

Page 17
the two from New Hampshire and from South Carolina) may probably render themselves at Philadelphia in fifteen or twenty days; the majority may be there in much less time.
Page 48
The Roman provinces did not stand more in need of patronage than ours: and such clients as we are would have preferred the integrity of Cato to the fortune of Cæsar.
Page 50
It is a known custom among farmers, to change their corn from season to season, for the.
Page 54
Unanimous resolution of the assembly concerning the necessity of a remission of their paper-currency.
Page 80
Whatever charges arise on the carriage of goods are added to the value, and all paid by the consumer.
Page 150
" It seems then we have "_reasonable demands_" to make, and, as you call them a little higher, _equitable demands_.
Page 166
Iron is to be found every where in America, and beaver are the natural produce of that country: hats, and nails and steel are wanted there as well as here.
Page 188
_ I suppose they will think, that it was repealed from a conviction of its inexpediency; and they will rely upon it, that while the same inexpediency subsists, you will never attempt to make such another.
Page 189
Every sober, sensible man would wish to see rioters punished, as otherwise peaceable people have no security of person or estate.
Page 202
" I hope your information is good; and that what you suppose to be in contemplation will be carried into execution, by repealing all the laws, that have been made for raising a revenue in America by authority of parliament without the consent of the people there.
Page 220
Their affection and respect for this country, while they were treated with kindness, produced an almost implicit obedience to the instructions of the prince, and even to acts of the British parliament, though the right of binding them by a legislature, in which they were unrepresented, was never clearly understood.
Page 261
_ Savages we call them, because their manners differ from ours, which we.
Page 293
I endeavour to conceal my uneasiness as much as possible, and with a grave look go to sorting them out.
Page 302
One of the greatest pleasures an author can have, is, certainly, the hearing his works applauded.
Page 305
Many are the idle stories told of the private success of some people, by which others are encouraged to proceed; and the astrologers, with whom the country swarms at this time, are either in the belief of these things themselves, or find their advantage in persuading others to believe them; for they are often consulted about the critical times for digging, the methods of laying the spirit, and the like whimsies, which renders them very necessary to, and very much caressed by, the poor deluded money-hunters.
Page 321
Third.
Page 333
By this generous civility (so opposite to the unfairness above forbidden) you may, indeed, happen to lose the game to your opponent, but you will win what is better, his esteem, his respect, and his affection, together with the silent approbation and good-will of impartial spectators.
Page 346
_ To all captains and commanders of armed ships, acting by commission from the congress of the United States of America, now in war with Great Britain.
Page 368
They come to town on certain days of the week in companies to receive the children, and we often meet trains of them on the road returning to the neighbouring villages with each a child in arms.
Page 401
270.