The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 153

| | | | |Oct 29, 1776 |
| Nov | | | | | | | | | | |
| 1| 10 | | | 78 |WSW | E½N | 109 |No ob|68 12| |
| --| | 4 | 71 | 81 | | | | | | |
| 2| 8 | | 71 | 75 | N | | | | |Some sparks in |
| --| 12 | | | 78 | | | 141 |ditto|65 23|the water these|
| --| | 4 | 67 | 76 | | | | | |two last nights|
| 3| 8 | | | 76 | NW | ESE½E| | | | |
| --| 12 | | | 76 | | EbS | 160 |37 0|62 7|

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

Page 12
3.
Page 50
As to ourselves, we need no longer have recourse to the late glorious stand of the French parliament to excite our emulation.
Page 114
_To the Freemen of Pensylvania, on the Subject of a particular Militia-Bill, rejected by the Proprietor's Deputy or Governor.
Page 153
The money voted was immediately paid me.
Page 154
_ The regulations in this plan seem to me to be in general very good: but some few appear to want explanation, or farther consideration.
Page 187
_ It is hard to say what they would do.
Page 201
Will not a repeal of all the duties (that on tea excepted, which was before paid here on exportation, and of course no new imposition) fully satisfy the colonists[98]? If you answer in the negative, 2d.
Page 203
_Unnecessary_, because in all the colonies (two or three new ones excepted[100]) government and the administration of justice were, and always had been, well supported without any charge to Britain: _unjust_, as it has made such colonies liable to pay such charge for others, in which they had no concern or interest: _dangerous_, as such mode of raising money for those purposes tended to render their assemblies useless; for if a revenue could be raised in the colonies for all the purposes of government by act of parliament, without grants from the people there, governors, who do not generally love assemblies, would never call them; they would be laid aside; and when nothing should depend on the people's good-will to government, their rights would be trampled on; they would be treated with contempt.
Page 208
_State of the Constitution of the Colonies, by Governor Pownall[104]; with Remarks by Dr.
Page 216
We only assert, that having parliaments of our own, and not having representatives in that of Great Britain, our parliaments are the only judges of what we can and what we ought to contribute in this case; and that the English parliament has no right to take our money without our consent.
Page 229
V.
Page 263
" Having frequent occasions to hold public councils, they have acquired great order and decency in conducting them.
Page 315
_ Written Anno 1736.
Page 322
The following is the original piece, with some additions and corrections made in it by the author.
Page 323
Pray make my compliments and best wishes acceptable to your bride.
Page 331
III.
Page 362
Great numbers of our people are of British race, and though the fierce fighting animals of those happy islands are said to abate their native fire and intrepidity, when removed to a foreign clime, yet with the people it is not so; our neighbours of New England afford the world a convincing proof, that Britons, though a hundred years transplanted, and to the remotest part of the earth, may yet retain, even to the third and fourth descent, that zeal for the public good, that military prowess, and that undaunted spirit, which has in every age distinguished their nation.
Page 384
of steam from fermenting liquors, 59.
Page 385
_Canada_, importance of, to England, i.
Page 414
386.