The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 164

| 80 | 77 |
| 23 |35 35 |40 52| 7 | 77 | 78| 75 |North|W ¼ S | 100 | | omitted.|
| 24 |35 12 |41 31| 75| 73 | 75| 74 |W N W|S WbW | 41 | | 75 | 74 |
| 25 |35 40 |42 33| 79| 76 | 79| 76 |W b N|W NW¾N| 60 | | 80 | 76 |
| 26 |35 30 |42 44| 79| 76 | 80| 76 |S WbW|S W½S | 14 | | 80 | 76 |
| 27 |35 14 |43 23| 79| 77 | 81| 79 |West |W SW¼S| 38 | | 81 | 78 |
| 28 |34 23 |44 0| 7 | 76 | 78| 78 |N N E|S WbS | 60 | | 78 | 78 |
| 29 |34 12 |45 52| 77| 78 | 78| 78 |N E |W ¼ S | 94 | 8° 0| 79 | 78 |
| 30 |34 5 |48 31| 78| 78 | 78| 78 |East |W ½ S | 134 | | 78 | 78 |
| 31 |34 20 |51 4| 80| 79 | 81| 79 |East |W ¾ S | 129 | | 80 | 80 |
|Sep | | | | | | | | | | | | |
| 1 |34 20 |52 47| 81| 78 | omitted |S S W|W ¼ N | 86 | | 83 | 80 |
| 2 |34 55 |55 12| 81| 80 | 83| 80 |S W |WbN ½W|

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Text Comparison with The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Page 1
After a most extraordinary series of adventures, the original form of the manuscript was finally printed by Mr.
Page 2
Asaph's,[0] 1771.
Page 22
I cut so miserable a figure, too, that I found, by the questions ask'd me, I was suspected to be some runaway servant, and in danger of being taken up on that suspicion.
Page 25
Keimer's printing-house, I found, consisted of an old shatter'd press, and one small, worn-out font of English which he was then using himself, composing an Elegy on Aquila Rose, before mentioned, an ingenious young man, of excellent character, much respected in the town, clerk of the Assembly, and a pretty poet.
Page 34
"I doubt," said he, "my constitution will not bear that.
Page 39
and comparing circumstances, I began to doubt his sincerity.
Page 46
I taught him and a friend of his to swim at twice going into the river, and they soon became good swimmers.
Page 49
I found in his house these hands: Hugh Meredith, a Welsh Pensilvanian, thirty years of age, bred to country work; honest, sensible, had a great deal of solid observation, was something of a reader, but given to drink.
Page 53
My mind having been much more improv'd by reading than Keimer's, I suppose it was for that reason my conversation seem'd to be more valu'd.
Page 72
It might, too, be much better done if I were at home among my papers, which would aid my memory, and help to ascertain dates; but my return being uncertain and having just now a little leisure, I will endeavor to recollect and write what I can; if I live to get home, it may there be corrected and improv'd.
Page 76
It was about this time I conceiv'd the bold and arduous project of arriving at moral perfection.
Page 77
These names of virtues, with their precepts, were: 1.
Page 102
Most of them did well, being enabled at the end of our term, six years, to purchase the types of me and go on working for themselves, by which means several families were raised.
Page 103
There were, however, two things that I regretted, there being no provision for defense, nor for a compleat education of youth; no militia, nor any college.
Page 114
The orator acknowledg'd the fault, but laid it upon the rum; and then endeavored to excuse the rum by saying, "The Great Spirit, who made all things, made every thing for some use, and whatever use he design'd any thing for, that use it should always be put to.
Page 121
To do this, a variety of improvements were necessary; some of these were inevitably at first expensive, so that in the first four years the office became above nine hundred pounds in debt to us.
Page 125
At length Captain Denny, who was Governor Morris's successor, ventured to disobey those instructions; how that was brought about I shall show hereafter.
Page 131
I undertook this also, and was busily employ'd in it till we heard of his defeat, advancing for the service of my own money, upwards of one thousand pounds sterling, of which I sent him an account.
Page 149
There were then two of the paquet-boats, which had been long in port, but were detained for the general's letters, which were always to be ready to-morrow.
Page 153
It has been remark'd, as an imperfection in the art of ship-building, that it can never be known, till she is tried, whether a.