The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 280

|
| v |Ever. | ev |The same; fuller and duller. |
| b |Bees. | b |The _lips full together_, and _opened_|
| | | | as the air passes out. |
| p |Peep. | pi |The same; but a thinner sound. |
| m |Ember. | em |The _closing_ of the lips, while the |
| | | | _e_ [here annexed] is sounding. |
+-----+-----------------------+-----+--------------------------------------+

* _N. B._ The six new letters are marked with an asterisk (*) to
distinguish them, and show how few new characters are proposed. B. V.

[Transcriber Note: The original text used italic styling on each
character in columns 1 and 3 above, and column 1 below. This
styling (underscores) has been removed from the tables for clarity.]


REMARKS [_on the Alphabetical Table_.]

{ It is endeavoured to give the alphabet
o { a _more natural order_; beginning first with
{ the simple sounds formed by the breath,
to {

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Text Comparison with Franklin's Way to Wealth; or, "Poor Richard Improved"

Page 0
The Poetical Illustrations are simple, and well calculated to the purpose of becoming a vehicle of instruction to juvenile minds, and the elucidations of the fables are plausible and ingenious.
Page 1
Proprietors, W.
Page 2
I.
Page 3
--If we are industrious, we shall never starve; for "at the working man's house hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
Page 4
Handle your tools without mittens: remember, that "The cat in gloves catches no mice," as Poor Richard says.
Page 5
A fat kitchen makes a lean will;" and, "Many estates are spent in the getting, Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, And men for punch forsook hewing and splitting.
Page 6
You call them goods; but, if you do not take care, they will prove evils to some of you.
Page 7
" When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece; but Poor Dick says, "It is easier to suppress the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 8
Those have a short Lent, who owe money to be paid at Easter.
Page 9
--I found the good man had thoroughly studied my Almanacks, and digested all I had dropt on those topics during the course of twenty-five years.