The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 50

eyes and ears both concurring to give me this
sentiment, I could have no more evidence than to feel the effects,
which I had no inclination to do.

It surprises me a little, that wind, generated by fermentation, is
new to you, since it may be every day observed in fermenting liquor.
You know with what force fermenting liquors will burst the vessels
which contain them, if the generated wind have not vent; and with
what force it issues on giving it a small vent, or by drawing the
cork of a bottle. Dr. Boerhaave says, that the steam issuing from
fermenting liquors received through a very small vent-hole, into the
nose, will kill as suddenly and certainly as lightning. That air is
generated by fermentation, I think you will find fully proved in Dr.
Hales's Analysis of the Air, in his Vegetable Statics. If you have
not read the book, you have a new pleasure to come.

The solution you give to the objection I made from the contrary winds
blowing from the opposite sides of the mountains, from their being
eddies, does not please me, because the extent of these winds is by
far too large to be occasioned by any eddy. It is forty miles from
New York to our mountains, through which Hudson's River passes. The
river runs twelve miles in the mountains, and from the north side of
the mountains it is about ninety miles to Albany. I have myself been
on board a vessel more than once, when we have had a strong northerly
wind against us, all the way from New York, for two or three days.
We have met vessels from Albany, who assured us, that, on the other
side of the mountains, they had, at the same time, a strong continued
southerly wind against them; and this frequently happens.

I have frequently seen, both on the river, in places where there
could be no eddy-weeds, and on the open sea, two vessels sailing with
contrary winds, within half a mile of each other; but this happens
only in easy winds, and generally calm in other places near these
winds.

You have, no doubt, frequently observed a single cloud pass, from
which a violent gust of wind issues, but of no great extent. I have
observed such a gust make a lane through the woods, of some miles
in length, by laying the trees flat to the ground, and not above
eight or ten chains in breadth. Though the violence of the wind be
in the same direction in which the cloud moves and precedes it, yet
wind issues

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Benjamin Franklin Representative selections, with introduction, bibliograpy, and notes

Page 8
Trimmers (1743), 183 To the Publick (1743), 186 Preface to Logan's Translation of "Cato Major" (1743/4), 187 To John Franklin, at Boston (March 10, 1745), 188 Preface to _Poor Richard_ (1746), 189 The Speech of Polly Baker (1747), 190 Preface to _Poor Richard_ (1747), 193 To Peter Collinson (August 14, 1747), 194 Preface to _Poor Richard Improved_ (1748), 195 Advice to a Young Tradesman (1748), 196 To George Whitefield (July 6, 1749), .
Page 55
"[i-233] To Dupont de Nemours he admitted that British mercantilism had not achieved "that wisdom which sees the welfare of the parts in the prosperity of the whole.
Page 63
By 1758 his "Patience with the Proprietors is almost tho' not quite spent.
Page 130
Examined by Wedderburn before the Privy Council (January 29) in regard to the Hutchinson-Oliver correspondence.
Page 144
G.
Page 216
-- [D] I got his Son once 500 L.
Page 269
But let us take the Argument in another View, and suppose ourselves to be, in the common sense of the Word, _Free Agents_.
Page 310
But it being the general Belief of the Populace that the Women's shifts and the Garters with which they were bound help'd to support them, it is said they are to be tried again the next warm Weather, naked.
Page 322
HINTS FOR THOSE THAT WOULD BE RICH [October, 1736--From _Poor Richard_, 1737] The Use of Money is all the Advantage there is in having Money.
Page 384
| 3 | 9 | | 21 | 7 56 | 1 30 | 4 | 10 | | 22 | 9 11 | 2 26 | 5 | 11 | | 23 | 10 18 | 3 16 | 6 | 12 | | 24 | 11 19 | 4 5 | 7 | 13 | | 25 | 12 22 | 4 54 | 7 | 14 | | 26 | M 22 | 5 43 | 8 | 15 | | 27 | 1 17 | 6 34 | 9 | 16 | | 28 | 2 21 | 7 26 | 10 | 17 | | 29 | 3 16 | 8 14 | 11 | 18 | | 30 | 4 3 | 9 3 | 12 | 19 | | 31 | 4 44 | 9 51 | 12 | 20 | +----+----------+----------+----+------+ =The= Greatness of that Power, which has been exerted in the Creation, though every Object in Nature shews.
Page 387
= | 6 45 | 5 15 | | 15 | 5 |Days inc.
Page 389
| 3 | 19 | _Setting too good_ | | 4 |[Pisces] 1 | _an Example_ | | 5 | 13 | [Mercury] rise 5 34 | | 6 | 25 | [Conjunction] [Moon] [Venus] [Conjunction] | | | | [Saturn] [Mars] | | 7 |[Aries] 7 | [Venus] sets 8 2 _is a_ | | 8 | 20 | _Kind of Slander_ | | 9 |[Taurus] 3 | _seldom forgiven;_ | | 10 | 16 | .
Page 390
8 21 | | 18 |[Virgo] 12 | [Sun] in [Pisces] _no Fool,_ | | 19 | 26 | Sirius sou.
Page 418
days, &c.
Page 419
| 4 55 | 7 5 | | 14 | 2 | _pleasant,_ | 4 54 | 7 6 | | 15 | 3 | _with_ | 4 53 | 7 7 | | 16 | 4 |Day inc.
Page 429
Thy pow'ful Word again restores their Breath; Renew'd Creation triumphs over Death.
Page 556
FRANKLIN.
Page 616
neglect thereof to us at his peril.
Page 624
If the injured and exasperated farmers, unable to procure other justice, should attack the aggressors, drub them, and burn their boats; you are to call this _high treason and rebellion_, order fleets and armies into their country, and threaten to carry all the offenders three thousand miles to be hanged, drawn, and quartered.
Page 697
Year my Discharge from this publick Station, that I might enjoy a little Leisure in the Evening of a long Life of Business; but it was refus'd me, and I have been obliged to drudge on a little longer.