The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 69

warmed by the friction of the air on its surface? To these
queries of imagination, I will only add one practical observation;
that wherever it is thought proper to give ease, in cases of painful
inflammation in the flesh (as from burnings, or the like) by cooling
the part; linen cloths, wet with spirit, and applied to the part
inflamed, will produce the coolness required, better than if wet with
water, and will continue it longer. For water, though cold when first
applied, will soon acquire warmth from the flesh, as it does not
evaporate fast enough; but the cloths wet with spirit, will continue
cold as long as any spirit is left to keep up the evaporation, the
parts warmed escaping as soon as they are warmed, and carrying off
the heat with them.

I am, Sir, &c.

B FRANKLIN.

FOOTNOTE:

[15] Pensylvania is in about lat. 40, and the sun, of course, about
12 degrees higher, and therefore much hotter than in England. Their
harvest is about the end of June, or beginning of July, when the sun
is nearly at the highest.




J. B.[16] ESQ. IN BOSTON, TO B. FRANKLIN.

_Concerning the Light in Sea-Water._

Read at the Royal Society, December 6, 1756.


_November_ 12, 1753.

**** When I was at the eastward, I had an opportunity of observing
the luminous appearance of the sea when disturbed: at the head and
stern of the vessel, when under way, it appeared very bright. The
best opportunity I had to observe it was in a boat, in company with
several gentlemen going from Portsmouth, about three miles, to our
vessel lying at the mouth of Piscataqua River. Soon after we set
off (it being in the evening) we observed a luminous appearance,
where the oars dashed the water. Sometimes it was very bright, and
afterwards, as we rowed along, gradually lessened, till almost
imperceptible, and then re-illumined. This we took notice of several
times in the passage. When I got on board the vessel, I ordered a
pail to be dipped up, full of sea-water, in which, on the water's
being moved, a sparkling light appeared. I took a linen cloth,
and strained some of the water through it, and there was a like
appearance on the cloth, which soon went off; but on rubbing the
cloth with my finger, it was renewed. I then carried the cloth to the
light, but could not perceive any thing upon it which should cause
that appearance.

Several gentlemen were of opinion, that the separated particles
of putrid, animal, and other bodies, floating on

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 4
116 On the theory of the earth 117 New and curious theory of light and heat 122 Queries and conjectures relating to magnetism and the theory of the earth 125 On the nature of sea coal 125 Effect of vegetation on noxious air 129 On the inflammability of the surface of certain rivers in America 130 On the different quantities of rain which fall at different heights over the same ground 133 Slowly sensible hygrometer proposed, for certain purposes 135 Curious instance of the effect of oil on water 142 Letters on the stilling of waves by means of oil .
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other with some degree of force: now this force, on this supposition, must not only act when the particles are in mutual contact, but likewise when they are at some distance from each other.
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Dr.
Page 71
_ SIR, **** It has, indeed, as you observe, been the opinion of some very great naturalists, that the sea is salt only from the dissolution of mineral or rock-salt, which its waters happened to meet with.
Page 80
Why damp clothes should then occasion colds, is a curious question, the discussion of which I reserve for a future letter, or some future conversation.
Page 117
TO SIR JOHN PRINGLE, BART.
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move out of its way all the air its whole dimension meets with between the pricked lines CG and DG.
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| W.
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| | 24 |35 12 |41 31| 75| 73 | 75| 74 |W N W|S WbW | 41 | | 75 | 74 | | 25 |35 40 |42 33| 79| 76 | 79| 76 |W b N|W NW¾N| 60 | | 80 | 76 | | 26 |35 30 |42 44| 79| 76 | 80| 76 |S WbW|S W½S | 14 | | 80 | 76 | | 27 |35 14 |43 23| 79| 77 | 81| 79 |West |W SW¼S| 38 | | 81 | 78 | | 28 |34 23 |44 0| 7 | 76 | 78| 78 |N N E|S WbS | 60 | | 78 | 78 | | 29 |34 12 |45 52| 77| 78 | 78| 78 |N E |W ¼ S | 94 | 8° 0| 79 | 78 | | 30 |34 5 |48 31| 78| 78 | 78| 78 |East |W ½ S | 134 | | 78 | 78 | | 31 |34 20 |51 4| 80| 79 | 81| 79 |East |W ¾ S | 129 | | 80 | 80 | |Sep | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 |34 20 |52 47| 81| 78 | omitted |S S W|W ¼ N | 86 | | 83 | 80 | | 2 |34 55 |55 12| 81| 80 | 83| 80 |S W |WbN ½W|.
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It must lie in water so deep as that you cannot reach it to take it up but by diving for it.
Page 182
Gauger, in his tract entitled, _La Mechanique de Feu_) for warming the air as it comes into the room.
Page 194
But it must be allowed there may have been some cause to complain of the offensive smell of iron stoves.
Page 203
The equal dimensions of a funnel in its whole length is not thought artificial enough, and it is made, for fancied reasons, sometimes tapering and narrowing from below upwards, and sometimes the contrary, &c.
Page 226
wrapt well in wet linen cloths, three or four fold, I am confident, that if the linen is kept wet, by sprinkling it once a day, the meat would be so cooled by the evaporation, carried on continually by means of the passing air, that it would keep a week or more in the hottest weather.
Page 242
How much more must have passed off in the air? And we know that this soot is still fuel; for it will burn and flame as such, and when hard caked together is indeed very like and almost as solid as the coal it proceeds from.
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3.
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These lessons might be given every night as tasks; the scholars to study them against the morning.
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The end of every individual is its own private good.
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_Innovations_ in language and printing, ii.
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72.