The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 86

the quantity of matter multiplied by the celerity,
(or _f_ = _c_ X _a_); and as the force received by and subsisting in
matter, when it is put in motion, can never exceed the force given;
so if, _f_ moves _a_ with _c_, there must needs be required 2 _f_ to
move _a_ with 2 _c_; for _a_ moving with 2 _c_ would have a force
equal to 2 _f_, which it could not receive from 1 _f_; and this, not
because there is such a thing as vis inertiæ, for the case would be
the same _if that had no existence_; but because nothing _can_ give
more than it has, if 1 _f_ can to 1 _a_ give 1 _c_, which is the
same thing as giving it 1 _f_; (i. e. if force applied to matter at
rest, can put it in motion, and give it _equal_ force) where then is
vis inertiæ? If it existed at all in matter, should we not find the
quantity of its resistance subtracted from the force given?

In No. 4. our author goes on and says, "the body _a_ requires a
certain force to be impressed on it to be moved with a celerity as
_c_, or such a force is necessary; and therefore makes a certain
resistance, &c. A body as 2 _a_ requires _twice_ that force to be
moved with the _same celerity_, or it makes twice that resistance;
and so on."--This I think is not true; but that the body 2 _a_ moved
by the force 1 _f_ (though the eye may judge otherwise of it) does
really move with the same celerity as it did when impelled by the
same force; for 2 _a_ is compounded of 1 _a_ + 1 _a_: and if each of
the 1 _a_'s or each part of the compound were made to move with 1 _c_
(as they might be by 2 _f_) then the whole would move with 2 _c_, and
not with 1 _c_, as our author supposes. But 1 _f_ applied to 2 _a_,
makes each _a_ move with ½ _c_; and so the whole moves with 1 _c_;
exactly the same as 1 _a_ was made to do by 1 _f_ before. What is
equal celerity but a _measuring the same space by moving bodies in
the same time_?--Now if 1 _a_ impelled by 1 _f_ measures 100 yards
in a minute; and in 2 _a_ impelled by 1 _f_, each _a_ measures 50
yards in a minute, which added make 100; are not the celerities as
the

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 41
And I used to think, that although water be specifically heavier than air, yet such a bubble, filled only with fire and very rarefied air, may be lighter than a quantity of common air, of the same cubical dimensions,.
Page 66
But when the thermometer was taken out of the ether, and the ether, with which the ball was wet, began to evaporate, the mercury sunk several degrees.
Page 71
I own I am inclined to a different opinion, and rather think all the water on this globe was originally salt, and that the fresh water we find in springs and rivers, is the produce of distillation.
Page 81
But we must hazard something in what we think the cause of truth: and if we propose our objections modestly, we shall, though mistaken, deserve a censure less severe, than when we are both mistaken and insolent.
Page 89
Such changes in the superficial parts of the globe, seemed to me unlikely to happen, if the earth were solid to the centre.
Page 149
M.
Page 164
| | 24 |35 12 |41 31| 75| 73 | 75| 74 |W N W|S WbW | 41 | | 75 | 74 | | 25 |35 40 |42 33| 79| 76 | 79| 76 |W b N|W NW¾N| 60 | | 80 | 76 | | 26 |35 30 |42 44| 79| 76 | 80| 76 |S WbW|S W½S | 14 | | 80 | 76 | | 27 |35 14 |43 23| 79| 77 | 81| 79 |West |W SW¼S| 38 | | 81 | 78 | | 28 |34 23 |44 0| 7 | 76 | 78| 78 |N N E|S WbS | 60 | | 78 | 78 | | 29 |34 12 |45 52| 77| 78 | 78| 78 |N E |W ¼ S | 94 | 8° 0| 79 | 78 | | 30 |34 5 |48 31| 78| 78 | 78| 78 |East |W ½ S | 134 | | 78 | 78 | | 31 |34 20 |51 4| 80| 79 | 81| 79 |East |W ¾ S | 129 | | 80 | 80 | |Sep | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 |34 20 |52 47| 81| 78 | omitted |S S W|W ¼ N | 86 | | 83 | 80 | | 2 |34 55 |55 12| 81| 80 | 83| 80 |S W |WbN ½W|.
Page 229
Page 285.
Page 266
I think too, that if you had given it to some country girl in the heart of the Massachusets, who has never heard any other than psalm tunes, or _Chevy Chace_, the _Children in the Wood_, the _Spanish Lady_, and such old simple ditties, but has naturally a good ear, she might more probably have made a pleasing popular tune for you, than any of our masters here, and more proper for your purpose, which would best be answered, if every word could as it is sung be understood by all that hear it, and if the emphasis you intend for particular words could be given by the singer as well as by the reader; much of the force and impression of the song depending on those circumstances.
Page 288
_ Let the first class learn the English Grammar rules, and at the same time let particular care be taken to improve them in orthography.
Page 294
_Observations concerning the Increase of Mankind, peopling of Countries, &c[77].
Page 297
The negroes, brought into the English sugar islands, have greatly diminished the whites there; the poor are by this means deprived of employment, while a few families acquire vast estates, which they spend on foreign luxuries; and, educating their children in the habit of those luxuries, the same income is needed for the support of one, that might have maintained one hundred.
Page 298
21.
Page 299
In fine, a nation well regulated is like a polypus[79], take away a limb, its place is soon supplied; cut it in two, and each deficient part shall speedily grow out of the part remaining.
Page 304
The inhabitants of this country, a few ages back, were to the populous and rich provinces of France, what Canada is now to the British colonies.
Page 336
"What, the devil!" says another, "have we then _thieves_ amongst us? It must not be suffered.
Page 348
of accusing and abusing the other four hundred and ninety-nine parts, at their pleasure; or they may hire out their pens and press to others, for that purpose.
Page 350
If he conceals himself behind the printer, and you can nevertheless discover who he is, you may, in like manner, way-lay him in the night, attack him behind, and give him a good drubbing.
Page 371
95.
Page 394
'sik-worm' replaced by 'silk-worm'.