The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 0

TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE

This is Volume 3 of a 3-volume set. The other two volumes are also
accessible in Project Gutenberg using
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48136 and
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48137.

Italic text is denoted by _underscores_.

Obvious typographical errors and punctuation errors have been
corrected after careful comparison with other occurrences within
the text and consultation of external sources.

More detail can be found at the end of the book.




The
WORKS
Of
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, L.L.D.

VOL. 3.

[Illustration: (Stalker Sculptor.)]

PRINTED,

for Longman, Hurst, Rees & Orme, Paternoster Row, London.




THE
COMPLETE
WORKS,
IN
PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, AND MORALS,
OF THE LATE
DR. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN,
NOW FIRST COLLECTED AND ARRANGED:
WITH
MEMOIRS OF HIS EARLY LIFE,
WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

London:

PRINTED FOR J. JOHNSON, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH-YARD;
AND LONGMAN, HURST, REES, AND ORME,
PATERNOSTER-ROW.

1806.

JAMES CUNDEE, PRINTER,
LONDON.




CONTENTS.


VOL. III.


PAPERS ON AMERICAN SUBJECTS BEFORE THE REVOLUTIONARY
TROUBLES.

_Page._

Albany papers; containing, I. reasons and motives on which the
plan of union for the colonies was formed;--II. reasons against
partial unions;--III. and the plan of union drawn by B. F. and
unanimously agreed to by the commissioners from New Hampshire,
Massachusett's Bay, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maryland,
and Pensylvania, met in congress at Albany, in July 1754, to consider
of the best means of defending the king's dominions in America,
&c. a war being then apprehended; with the reasons or
motives for each article of the plan 3

Albany papers continued. I. letter to Governor Shirley, concerning
the imposition of direct taxes

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Text Comparison with The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Page 2
To which I have besides some other inducements.
Page 9
have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to converse with, and always took care to start some ingenious or useful topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his children.
Page 13
As we parted without settling the point, and were not to see one another again for some time, I sat down to put my arguments in writing, which I copied fair and sent to him.
Page 22
She invited me to lodge at her house till a passage by water should offer; and being tired with my foot travelling, I accepted the invitation.
Page 23
I have been the more particular in this description of my journey, and shall be so of my first entry into that city, that you may in your mind compare such unlikely beginnings with the figure I have since made there.
Page 24
He introduc'd me to his son, who receiv'd me civilly, gave me a breakfast, but told me he did not at present want a hand, being lately suppli'd with one; but there was another printer in town, lately set up,.
Page 25
The old gentleman said he would go with me to the new printer; and when we found him, "Neighbor," says Bradford, "I have brought to see you a young man of your business; perhaps you may want such a one.
Page 26
These two printers I found poorly qualified for their business.
Page 27
He said I appear'd a young man of promising parts, and therefore should be encouraged; the printers at Philadelphia were wretched ones; and, if I would set up there, he made no doubt I should succeed; for his part, he would procure me the public business, and do me every other service in his power.
Page 28
He receiv'd me not very frankly, look'd me all over, and turn'd to his work again.
Page 53
They had me to their houses, introduced me to their friends, and show'd me much civility; while he, tho' the master, was a little neglected.
Page 54
It happened that they wrought an effect on me quite contrary to what was intended by them; for the arguments of the Deists, which were quoted to be refuted, appeared to me much stronger than the refutations; in short, I soon became a thorough Deist.
Page 59
] Mr.
Page 67
Various concerns have for some time past prevented this letter being written, and I do not know whether it was worth any expectation; happening to be at leisure, however, at present, I shall by writing, at least interest and instruct myself; but as the terms I am inclined to use may tend to offend a person of your manners, I shall only tell you how I would address any other person, who was as good and as great as yourself, but less diffident.
Page 108
--[Marg.
Page 121
Thus, without studying in any college, I came to partake of their honours.
Page 132
The waggoners took each a horse out of his team and scamper'd;.
Page 144
Fothergill wrote the preface.
Page 154
new ship will or will not be a good sailer; for that the model of a good-sailing ship has been exactly follow'd in a new one, which has prov'd, on the contrary, remarkably dull.
Page 155
This was a most pleasing spectacle to those who had been so long without any other prospects than the uniform view of a vacant ocean, and it gave us the more pleasure as we were now free from the anxieties which the state of war occasion'd.