The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 192

themselves.

_Q._ Do you say there were no more than three hundred regular troops
employed in the late Indian war?

_A._ Not on the Ohio, or the frontiers of Pensylvania, which was
the chief part of the war that affected the colonies. There were
garrisons at Niagara, Fort Detroit, and those remote posts kept for
the sake of your trade; I did not reckon them; but I believe that on
the whole the number of Americans, or provincial troops, employed in
the war, was greater than that of the regulars. I am not certain, but
I think so.

_Q._ Do you think the assemblies have a right to levy money on the
subject there, to grant _to the crown_?

_A._ I certainly think so, they have always done it.

_Q._ Are they acquainted with the declaration of rights? And do they
know that, by that statute, money is not to be raised on the subject
but by consent of parliament?

_A._ They are very well acquainted with it.

_Q._ How then can they think they have a right to levy money for the
crown, or for any other than local purposes?

_A._ They understand that clause to relate to subjects only within
the realm; that no money can be levied on them for the crown, but
by consent of parliament. _The colonies_ are not supposed to be
within the realm; they have assemblies of their own, which are their
parliaments, and they are, in that respect, in the same situation
with Ireland. When money is to be raised for the crown upon the
subject in Ireland, or in the colonies, the consent is given in
the parliament of Ireland, or in the assemblies of the colonies.
They think the parliament of Great Britain cannot properly give
that consent, till it has representatives from America; for the
petition of right expressly says, it is to be by _common consent in
parliament_; and the people of America have no representatives in
parliament, to make a part of that common consent.

_Q._ If the stamp act should be repealed, and an act should pass,
ordering the assemblies of the colonies to indemnify the sufferers by
the riots, would they obey it?

_A._ That is a question I cannot answer.

_Q._ Suppose the king should require the colonies to grant a revenue,
and the parliament should be against their doing it, do they think
they can grant a revenue to the king, _without_ the consent of the
parliament of Great Britain?

_A._ That is a deep question. As to my own opinion, I should think
myself at liberty to do it, and should do it,

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 11
_ _LETTERS AND PAPERS_ ON PHILOSOPHICAL SUBJECTS.
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It appeared in the form of a sugar-loaf, spinning on its point, moving up the hill towards us, and enlarging as it came forward.
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122, is a letter from Mr.
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I have not had leisure to repeat and examine more than the first and easiest of them, _viz.
Page 66
By dipping first the ball of the thermometer into the ether, it appeared that the ether was precisely of the same temperament with the thermometer, which stood then at 65; for it made no alteration in the height of the little column of mercury.
Page 76
The Delaware, on which Philadelphia stands, is in this particular similar to the canal I have supposed of one wave: for when it is high water at the Capes or mouth of the river, it is also high water at Philadelphia, which stands about one hundred and forty miles from the sea; and there is at the same time a low water in the middle between the two high waters; where, when it comes to be high water, it is at the same time low water at the Capes and at Philadelphia.
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It is therefore with propriety that I address to you the following account of it; and the more, as you have both a head to contrive and a hand to execute the means of perfecting it.
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| | | | | | --| | 8 | | 75 | | | | | | | | 6| 8 | | | 76 |EbN | S50E | | | | | | --| 12 | | | 77 | | | 7 |35 33|53 52| | | 7| 8 | | | 78 |SEbE| N30W | | | | | | --| 12 | | | 77 | | | 108 |36 6|52 46| | | --| | 4 | | 77 | | | | | | | | 8| 9 | | 75 | 77 |SbE | N49E | | | | .
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| | 9 | | 4 | | 71 | | | | | | | | 10 | 8 | | 70 | 68 | | | | | | | | -- | 12 | | | 64 | E |N 17 E| 64 |40 39|46 27| | | 11 | 8 | | | 63 | | | | | | | | -- | 12 | | | 61 |S E |N 8 E | 41 |41 19|46 19| | | 12 | 8 | | 56 | 59 | | | | | | | | -- | | 4 | | 69 |NNW |N 80 E| 120 |41 39|43 42| | | 13 | all day | | 68 | E |S 82 E| 69 |41 29|42 10| .
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FOOTNOTES: [38] The.
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(i) The bottom plate, or hearth-piece, is round before, with a rising moulding, that serves as a fender to keep coals and ashes from coming to the floor, &c.
Page 211
into the chimney, sufficient to fill the opening, being necessary to oppose and prevent the smoke coming out into the room; it follows, that the openings of the longest funnels may be larger, and that those of the shorter funnels should be smaller.
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The fire kindled at seven in the morning would burn till noon; and all the iron of the machine with the walls of the niche being thereby heated, the room kept warm till evening, when another smaller fire kindled kept it warm till midnight.
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| ki |A kindred sound; a little more acute; | | | .
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399.
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It is obvious to remark, how greatly this must tend to check both the officers and the poor, and to inform and interest the parishioners with respect to parish concerns.
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_Boiling_ water, experiments with, i.
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Canton, 294.
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_ when fluid, or red hot, will conduct electricity, 256.
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107.