The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 201

convey to me.

1st. Will not a repeal of all the duties (that on tea excepted, which
was before paid here on exportation, and of course no new imposition)
fully satisfy the colonists[98]? If you answer in the negative,

2d. Your reasons for that opinion?

3d. Do you think the only effectual way of composing the present
differences is to put the Americans precisely in the situation they
were in before the passing of the late stamp-act?--If that is your
opinion,

4th. Your reasons for that opinion?

5th. If this last method is deemed by the legislature, and his
majesty's ministers, to be repugnant to their duty, as guardians of
the just rights of the crown and of their fellow-subjects; can you
suggest any other way of terminating these disputes, consistent with
the ideas of justice and propriety conceived by the king's subjects
on both sides of the Atlantic?

6. And if this method was actually followed, do you not think it
would actually encourage the violent and factious part of the
colonists to aim at still farther concessions from the mother-country?

7th. If they are relieved in part only, what do you, as a reasonable
and dispassionate man, and an equal friend to both sides, imagine
will be the probable consequences?

The answers to these questions, I humbly conceive, will include all
the information I want; and I beg you will favour me with them as
soon as may be. Every well-wisher to the peace and prosperity of the
British empire, and every friend to our truly happy constitution,
must be desirous of seeing even the most trivial causes of dissention
among our fellow-subjects removed. Our domestic squabbles, in my
mind, are nothing to what I am speaking of. This you know much
better than I do, and therefore I need add nothing farther to
recommend this subject to your serious consideration. I am, with
the most cordial esteem and attachment, dear sir, your faithful and
affectionate humble servant,

W. S.

FOOTNOTES:

[97] These letters have often been copied into our public prints.
Mr. Strahan, the correspondent, is printer to the king, and now
representative in parliament for Malmsbury in Wiltshire. An intimacy
of long standing had subsisted between him and Dr. Franklin. B. V.

It was the father of the present Mr. Strahan, who is also
king's-printer, and member of parliament. The friendship, which so
long subsisted between Mr. Strahan and Dr. Franklin, the latter, in
1775, formally abjured, in a letter addressed to Mr. Strahan, which
will be found in the order of its date, in a subsequent part of this
work. _Editor._

[98] In the year 1767, for the

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Text Comparison with The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 2 [of 3]

Page 2
by B.
Page 9
Franklin's writing in pencil in the margin of Judge Foster's celebrated argument in favour of the impressing of seamen .
Page 21
into it, together with the wind I mentioned, by their descent, which beat back the rising spray in the centre.
Page 34
The water in this circle was violently agitated, being whisked about, and carried up into the air with great rapidity and noise, and reflected a lustre, as if the sun shined bright on that spot, which was more conspicuous, as there appeared a dark circle around it.
Page 41
And I used to think, that although water be specifically heavier than air, yet such a bubble, filled only with fire and very rarefied air, may be lighter than a quantity of common air, of the same cubical dimensions,.
Page 50
Boerhaave says, that the steam issuing from fermenting liquors received through a very small vent-hole, into the nose, will kill as suddenly and certainly as lightning.
Page 64
Thus I imagine that animal heat arises by or from a kind of fermentation in the juices of the body, in the same manner as heat arises in the liquors preparing for distillation, wherein there is a separation of the spirituous, from the watry and earthy parts.
Page 84
FRANKLIN.
Page 91
In soft or hot iron the fluid of magnetism is naturally diffused equally; when within the influence of the magnet it is drawn to one end of the iron, made denser there and rarer at the other.
Page 143
Portable soup.
Page 157
| | 9 | | 4 | | 71 | | | | | | | | 10 | 8 | | 70 | 68 | | | | | | | | -- | 12 | | | 64 | E |N 17 E| 64 |40 39|46 27| | | 11 | 8 | | | 63 | | | | | | | | -- | 12 | | | 61 |S E |N 8 E | 41 |41 19|46 19| | | 12 | 8 | | 56 | 59 | | | | | | | | -- | | 4 | | 69 |NNW |N 80 E| 120 |41 39|43 42| | | 13 | all day | | 68 | E |S 82 E| 69 |41 29|42 10| .
Page 158
| | 14 | 8 | | 70 | 70 | |N 74 E| 111 |42 0|39 57| | | -- | |Noon| | 72 |ESE | | | | | | | -- | | 4 | | 71 | | | | | | | | 15 | 8 | | 61 | 69 | | | | | | | | -- | |Noon| | 68 |WSW |N 70 E| 186 |43 3|35 51| | | -- | | 4 | | 67 | | | | | | | | 16 | |Noon| 65 | 67 |S W |N 67 W| 48 |43 22|34 50| | | -- | | 4 | | 63 | | | | | | .
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| W.
Page 175
I have a French piece printed at Paris, 1724, entitled, _Observations sur la Saignée du Pied, et sur la Purgation au commencement de la Petite Verole, & Raisons de doubte contre l' Inoculation.
Page 177
In America I have often observed, that on the roofs of our shingled-houses, where moss is apt to grow in northern exposures, if there be any thing on the roof painted with white lead, such as balusters, or frames of dormant windows, &c.
Page 195
If sitting warm in a room made one subject to take cold on going out, lying warm in bed, should by a parity of reason, produce the same effect when we rise.
Page 208
The wanted air must then _indispensably_ be admitted into the room, to supply what goes off through the opening of the.
Page 233
There burning wood must be laid and left upon its grate till the barrel C is warm, and the smoke no longer rises at A, but descends towards C.
Page 255
FRANKLIN.
Page 303
The effects of industry and frugality in England are surprising; both the rent and the value of the inheritance of land depend on them greatly more than on nature, and this, though there is no considerable difference in the prices of our markets.