The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 202

express purpose of raising a revenue
in America, glass, red-lead, white-lead, painters' colours,
paper, and _tea_ (which last article was subject to various
_home_-impositions) became charged by act of parliament, with new
_permanent_ duties payable in the American ports. Soon after, in the
same sessions, (the East-India Company promising indemnification
for the experiment) a _temporary_ alteration was made with respect
to the _home_ customs or excise upon certain teas, in the hope
that a deduction in the nominal imposition, by producing a more
extended consumption, would give an increased sum to the exchequer.
Mr. Strahan, comparing only the _amounts_ of the imposed American
duty, and the deducted home duty, determines that the Americans
had suffered no new imposition. The Americans it seems, thought
otherwise. Had we established this precedent for a revenue, we
thought we had every thing to hope; yet we affect surprise, when the
colonies avoided an acquiescence which by parity of reasoning gave
_them_ every thing to fear. B. V.




_Answer to the preceding Queries._


_Craven Street, Nov. 29, 1769._

DEAR SIR,

Being just returned to town from a little excursion, I find yours
of the 21st, containing a number of queries, that would require
a pamphlet to answer them fully. You, however, desire only brief
answers, which I shall endeavour to give.

Previous to your queries, you tell me, that "you apprehend his
majesty's servants have now in contemplation, 1st, To relieve the
colonists from the taxes complained of; 2d, To preserve the honour,
the dignity, and the supremacy of the British legislature over
all his majesty's dominions." I hope your information is good;
and that what you suppose to be in contemplation will be carried
into execution, by repealing all the laws, that have been made for
raising a revenue in America by authority of parliament without
the consent of the people there. The honour and dignity of the
British legislature will not be hurt by such an act of justice and
wisdom. The wisest councils are liable to be misled, especially in
matters remote from their inspection. It is the persisting in an
error, not the correcting it, that lessens the honour of any man
or body of men. The supremacy of that legislature, I believe, will
be best preserved by making a very sparing use of it; never but
for the evident good of the colonies themselves, or of the whole
British empire; never for the partial advantage of Britain to their
prejudice. By such prudent conduct, I imagine, that supremacy may
be gradually strengthened, and in time fully established; but
otherwise, I apprehend it will be disputed, and lost

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Benjamin Franklin Representative selections, with introduction, bibliograpy, and notes

Page 1
Clark, University of Wisconsin_ FRANCIS PARKMAN, _Wilbur L.
Page 11
298 To Jared Ingersoll (December 11, 1762), 300 To Miss Mary Stevenson (March 25, 1763), 301 To John Fothergill, M.
Page 13
363 To William Franklin (October 6, 1773), 371 Preface to "An Abridgment of the Book of Common Prayer" (1773), 374 A Parable against Persecution, 379 A Parable on Brotherly Love, 380 To William Strahan (July 5, 1775), 381 To Joseph Priestley (July 7, 1775), 382 To a Friend in England (October 3, 1775), 383 To Lord Howe (July 30, 1776), 384 The Sale of the Hessians (1777), 387 Model of a Letter of Recommendation (April 2, 1777), 389 To ---- (October 4, 1777), .
Page 15
412 The Lord's Prayer (1779?), 414 The Levee (1779?), 417 Proposed New Version of the Bible (1779?), 419 To Joseph Priestley (February 8, 1780), 420 To George Washington (March 5, 1780), 421 To Miss Georgiana Shipley (October 8, 1780), 422 To Richard Price (October 9, 1780), 423 Dialogue between Franklin and the Gout (1780), 424 The Handsome and Deformed Leg (1780?), 430 To Miss Georgiana Shipley (undated), 432 To David Hartley (December 15, 1781), .
Page 150
Hull's review in _American Historical Review_, XXII, 401-3.
Page 180
-- He ent[e]red into Conversation with me while I took some Refreshment, and finding I had read a little, became very sociable and friendly.
Page 199
Mandevil[l]e, Author of the Fable of the Bees who had a Club there, of which he was the Soul, being a.
Page 223
thou a man diligent in his calling, he shall stand before kings, he shall not stand before mean men," I from thence considered industry as a means of obtaining wealth and distinction, which encourag'd me, tho' I did not think that I should ever literally _stand before kings_, which, however, has since happened; for I have stood before _five_, and even had the honour of sitting down with one, the King of Denmark, to dinner.
Page 242
This idea, being approv'd by the Junto, was communicated to the other clubs, but as arising in each of them; and though the plan was not immediately carried into execution, yet, by preparing the minds of people for the change, it paved the way for the law obtained a few years after, when the members of our clubs were grown into more influence.
Page 325
What can be more natural and easy than this? I might instance the like in many other particulars; but this may be sufficient to prevent our being taken for Conjurors.
Page 383
53 | 3 | 25 | | 6 | 7 0 | 1 36 | 4 | 26 | | 7 | 8 0 | 2 18 | 5 | 27 | | 8 | 8 54 | 3 0 | 6 | 28 | | 9 | 9 50 | 3 43 | 6 | 29 | | 10 | 10 47 | 4 27 | 7 | 30 | | 11 | 11 46 | 5 10 | 8 | 31 | | 12 | 12 50 | 5 55 | 8 | Jan.
Page 429
| 4 38 | 7 22 | | 6 | 4 | _wind and_ | 4 38 | 7 22 | .
Page 449
7 | 7 23 | 10 | 14 | | 26 | 0 50 | 8 20 | 11 | 15 | | 27 | 1 45 | 9 18 | 12 | 16 | | 28 | 2 47 | 10 18 | 1 | 17 | | 29 | 4 0 | 11 18 | 2 | 18 | .
Page 470
| | --> +----+----------+----------+----+------+ | 1 | 9 1 | 3 36 | 6 | 21 | | 2 | 9 41 | 4 27 | 7 | 22 | | 3 | 10 23 | 5 17 | 8 | 23 | | 4 | 11 16 | 6 6 | 9 | 24 | | 5 | 12 10 | 7 1 | 10 | 25 | | 6 | M.
Page 496
Lucy.
Page 529
I accompanied it about three quarters of a mile, till some limbs of dead trees, broken off by the whirl, flying about and falling near me, made me more apprehensive of danger; and then I stopped, looking at the top of it as it went on, which was visible, by means of the leaves contained in it, for a very great height above the trees.
Page 624
Redress no grievance, lest they should be encouraged to demand the redress of some other grievance.
Page 634
And Jacob said, "Reuben did wrong, but he repented.
Page 666
--_Keep us out of Temptation.
Page 733
Belief of a Providence, that takes Cognizance of, guards, and guides, and may favour particular Persons, there is no Motive to Worship a Deity, to fear its Displeasure, or to pray for its Protection.