The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 226

majesty, or having their desired effect. And finally, that
the said Thomas Hutchinson and Andrew Oliver have been among the
chief instruments in introducing a fleet and army into this province,
to establish and perpetuate their plans, whereby they have been not
only greatly instrumental [in] disturbing the peace and harmony
of the government, and causing unnatural and hateful discords and
animosities between the several parts of your majesty's extensive
dominions; but are justly chargeable with all that corruption of
morals, and all that confusion, misery, and bloodshed, which have
been the natural effects of posting an army in a populous town.

Wherefore we most humbly pray, that your majesty would be pleased
to remove from their posts in this government the said Thomas
Hutchinson, Esquire, and Andrew Oliver, Esquire; who have, by
their above-mentioned conduct, and otherwise, rendered themselves
justly obnoxious to your loving subjects, and entirely lost their
confidence; and place such good and faithful men in their stead, as
your majesty in your wisdom shall think fit.

In the name and by order of the house of
representatives,

THOMAS CUSHING, _Speaker_.


TO THE LORDS COMMITTEE OF HIS MAJESTY'S PRIVY COUNCIL FOR PLANTATION
AFFAIRS.

THE PETITION OF ISRAEL MAUDUIT,

_Humbly sheweth unto your lordships_,

That having been informed, that an address, in the name of
the house of representatives of his majesty's colony of
Massachusett's Bay, has been presented to his majesty by Benjamin
Franklin, Esquire, praying the removal of his majesty's governor
and lieutenant-governor, which is appointed to be taken into
consideration on Thursday next; your petitioner, on the behalf of the
said governor and lieutenant governor, humbly prays, that he may be
heard by counsel in relation to the same, before your lordships shall
make any report on the said address.

ISRAEL MAUDUIT.

_Clement's Lane, Jan. 10, 1775._


_The Examination of Dr. Franklin, at the Council Chamber, Jan. 17,
1774[127]. Present, Lord President, the Secretaries of State, and
many other Lords; Dr. Franklin and Mr. Bollan; Mr. Mauduit and Mr.
Wedderburn._

Dr. Franklin's Letter and the Address, Mr. Pownall's Letter, and
Mr. Mauduit's Petition, were read.

_Mr. Wedderburn._ The address mentions certain papers: I could wish
to be informed what are those papers?

_Dr. Franklin._ They are the letters of Mr. Hutchinson and Mr. Oliver.

_Court._ Have you brought them?

_Dr. Franklin._ No, but here are attested copies.

_Court._ Do you mean to found a charge upon them? if you do, you must
produce the letters.

_Dr. Franklin._ These copies are attested by several gentlemen at
Boston, and a notary public.

_Mr. Wedderburn._ My

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Text Comparison with Experiments and Observations on Electricity Made at Philadelphia in America

Page 1
_London_.
Page 4
Place an electricised phial on wax; take a wire (_g_) in form of a C, the ends at such a distance when bent, as that the upper may touch the wire of the bottle, when the lower touches the bottom: stick the outer part on a stick of sealing wax (_h_) which will serve as a handle.
Page 8
The impossibility of electrising one's self (tho' standing on wax) by rubbing the tube and drawing the fire from it; and the manner of doing it by passing the tube near a person or thing standing on the floor, &c.
Page 11
_1748.
Page 13
10.
Page 14
--And this restitution cannot be made through the substance of the glass, but must be done by a non-electric communication formed without, from surface to surface.
Page 15
We then took two plates of lead of equal dimensions, but less than the glass by two inches every way, and electrified the glass between them, by electrifying the uppermost lead; then separated the glass from the lead, in doing which, what little fire might be in the lead was taken out and the glass being touched in the electrified parts with a finger, afforded only very small pricking sparks, but a great number of them might be taken from different places.
Page 17
--But if another bottle which had been charged through the coating be placed near the same wheel, its wire will attract the thimble repelled by the first, and thereby double the force that carries the wheel round; and not only taking out the fire that had been communicated to the thimbles by the first bottle, but even robbing them of their natural quantity, instead of being repelled when they come again towards the first bottle, they are more strongly attracted, so that the wheel mends its pace, till it goes with great rapidity twelve or fifteen rounds in a minute, and with such strength, as that the weight of one hundred _Spanish_ dollars with which we once loaded.
Page 18
It turns horizontally on a point at the lower end of its Axis, which rests on a bit of brass cemented within a glass salt-celler.
Page 21
1.
Page 24
If they are driven by winds against mountains, those mountains being less electrified attract them, and on contact take away their electrical fire (and being cold, the common fire also;) hence the particles close towards the mountains and towards each other.
Page 29
_I am, Sir, Your much obliged Humble Servant_, B.
Page 32
The atmosphere of electrical particles surrounding an electrified sphere, is not more disposed to leave it or more easily drawn off from any one part of the sphere than from another, because it is equally attracted by every part.
Page 34
But the force with which the electrified body retains its atmosphere by attracting it, is proportioned to the surface over which the particles are placed; i.
Page 39
Perhaps this may be the reason; when there is not a perfect continuity in the circle, the.
Page 40
26.
Page 42
This looks as if the whole received by the bottle was again discharged from it.
Page 50
Hang two cork balls by flaxen threads to the prime conductor; then touch the coating of the bottle, and they will be electrified and recede from each other.
Page 52
of studying it; with its Analysis or Division into Species, according to former Authors, and a new Plan, shewing the Errors and Defects of those by Varenius, Sanson, la Mattiniere, Pere Castel, etc.
Page 53
Electricity is so much in vogue, that above one hundred of them have been sold within these four months past.