The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 285

If every one of us,
in returning to our constituents, were to report the objections he
has had to it, and endeavour to gain partisans in support of them,
we might prevent its being generally received, and thereby lose all
the salutary effects and great advantages resulting naturally in our
favour among foreign nations, as well as among ourselves, from our
real or apparent unanimity. Much of the strength and efficiency of
any government, in procuring and securing happiness to the people,
depends on opinion, on the general opinion of the goodness of that
government, as well as of the wisdom and integrity of its governors.

I hope therefore, that for our own sakes, as part of the people, and
for the sake of our posterity, we shall act heartily and unanimously
in recommending this constitution, wherever our influence may extend,
and turn our future thoughts and endeavours to the means of having it
well administered.

On the whole, sir, I cannot help expressing a wish, that every member
of the convention, who may still have objections, would with me, on
this occasion, doubt a little of his own infallibility, and, to make
manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.

[The motion was then made for adding the last formula, viz.

Done in Convention, by the unanimous consent, &c. which was agreed
to, and added accordingly.]

FOOTNOTE:

[173] From the American Museum, vol. II. p. 558. _Editor._




PAPERS

ON

MORAL SUBJECTS

AND

_THE ECONOMY OF LIFE_.




PAPERS

ON

MORAL SUBJECTS

AND

_THE ECONOMY OF LIFE_.




_The Busy-Body._--No. I[174].

FROM THE AMERICAN WEEKLY MERCURY, FROM TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, TO
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1728,--9.


MR. ANDREW BRADFORD,

I design this to acquaint you, that I, who have long been one of your
courteous readers, have lately entertained some thought of setting up
for an author myself; not out of the least vanity, I assure you, or
desire of showing my parts, but purely for the good of my country.

I have often observed with concern, that your Mercury is not always
equally entertaining. The delay of ships expected in, and want of
fresh advices from Europe, make it frequently very dull; and I find
the freezing of our river has the same effect on news as trade.--With
more concern have I continually observed the growing vices and
follies of my country folk: and though reformation is properly the
concern of every man, that is, every one ought to mend one; yet it
is too true in this case, that what is every body's business is no
body's business, and the business is done accordingly. I therefore,
upon mature deliberation, think fit to take

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Franklin's Autobiography (Eclectic English Classics)

Page 5
Figure me in your mind as jolly as formerly, and as strong and hearty, only a few years older; very plainly dressed, wearing my thin, gray, straight hair, that.
Page 12
I think you may like to know something of his person and character.
Page 21
One of the pieces in our newspaper, on some political point which I have now forgotten, gave offense to the Assembly.
Page 26
There were canoes on the shore, and we made signs, and hallooed that they should fetch us; but they either did not understand us or thought it impracticable, so they went away, and night coming on, we had no remedy but to wait till the wind should abate.
Page 37
He liked it, but asked me if my being on the spot in England to choose the types, and see that everything was good of the kind, might not be of some advantage.
Page 42
] [Footnote 56: Entrapped.
Page 44
He had half ruined Miss Read's father by persuading him to be bound[60] for him.
Page 45
He seemed quite to forget his wife and child, and I, by degrees, my engagements with Miss Read, to whom I never wrote more than one letter, and that was to let her know I was not likely soon to return.
Page 73
Had he been in my opinion a good preacher, perhaps I might have continued, notwithstanding the occasion I had for the Sunday's leisure in my course of study; but his discourses were chiefly either polemic arguments or explications of the peculiar doctrines of our sect, and were all to me very dry, uninteresting,.
Page 80
| * | * | * | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | R[esolution] | | | * | | | * | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | F[rugality] | | * | | | * | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | I[ndustry] | | | * | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | S[incerity] | | | | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | J[ustice] | | | | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | M[oderation] | | | | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | C[leanliness] | | | | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | T[ranquillity] | | | | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | C[hastity] | | | | | | | | |----------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----| | H[umility] | | | | .
Page 82
.
Page 83
_Question.
Page 111
[n]] [Footnote 126: In London.
Page 112
Whitefield,[138] and was obtained for us in the following manner.
Page 116
Previously, however, to the solicitation, I endeavored to prepare the minds of the people by writing on the subject in the newspapers, which was my usual custom in such cases, but which he had omitted.
Page 132
You have an opportunity of receiving and dividing among you a very considerable sum; for, if the service of this expedition should continue, as it is more than probable it will, for one hundred and twenty days, the hire of these wagons and horses will amount to upward of thirty thousand pounds, which will be paid you in silver and gold of the king's money.
Page 137
How different was the conduct of our French friends in 1781, who, during a march through the most inhabited part of our country from Rhode Island to Virginia, near seven hundred miles, occasioned not the smallest complaint for the loss of a pig, a chicken, or even an apple.
Page 138
As soon as the loss of the wagons and horses was generally known, all the owners came upon me for the valuation which I had given bond to pay.
Page 159
In the morning it was found by the soundings, etc.
Page 163
] [Footnote 193: William Pitt (1708-78).