The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 3 [of 3]

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 57

captious message.

A remark thereon.

They are re-assembled.

A hardy assertion, concerning the paper-money act passed by governor
Thomas, refuted by a fact.

An acknowledgment from the officers of the regular forces of certain
presents made to them by the assembly.

The governor's message to the assembly, said to be founded on a
representation of general Braddock's, requiring them to enable him to
furnish the said general with provisions under proper convoys, &c. &c.

The assembly desire to have the general's letter laid before them,
which the governor declines, and thereby occasions a new controversy.

The assembly send up two other bills; one of 10,000_l._ for
exchanging old bills, and one of 15,000_l._ for the king's use, on
the model of that formerly passed by governor Thomas, and confirmed
at home by the royal authority, since the instruction so often cited
had been sent to the said governor.

Such amendments offered to it by the governor, as he could not but be
pre-convinced would not be allowed.

The assembly adjourn till September; but are again convoked in July,
on occasion of Braddock's defeat.

The governor's speech.

The assembly vote an aid of 50,000_l._ by a tax on all real and
personal estates.

The governor makes a pompous offer in the proprietary's name, of
certain lands west of Allegheny mountains, to such adventurers as
would fight for them, and calls upon the assembly to afford some
assistance to such as should accept the same.

A remonstrance which certain inhabitants of certain places were
induced to present to the assembly.

The address of the assembly to the governor.

Their 50,000_l._ money-bill returned, with an amendment, by which the
WHOLE _proprietary estate_ was to be _exempted_ from tax.

The message of the assembly to the governor on that occasion,
desiring his reasons for that exemption.

The governor's reply, containing four curious reasons.

The assembly's rejoinder, refuting those reasons.

Other papers which passed between them at the same crisis.

The residue of Braddock's troops being recalled from the frontiers,
notwithstanding an application of the assembly to the governor
requesting their continuance, he calls upon the house to provide for
the security of the Back-inhabitants.

A remark thereon.

The governor alarms and embarrasses them with petitions from certain
persons requiring to be armed; _intelligence_ of Indians actually
set out, to fall upon their frontiers; recommendations to provide
by law against exporting provisions to the enemy, as a requisite to
facilitate the reduction of Louisburgh; and _demands_ of all manner
of _things_ for the assistance of colonel Dunbar, who, by orders from
general Shirley, was again to proceed towards Fort Duquesne.

A proposal from certain gentlemen of Philadelphia to subscribe
500_l._ in lieu of the proprietary proportion

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Text Comparison with Benjamin Franklin Representative selections, with introduction, bibliograpy, and notes

Page 14
390 To David Hartley (October 14, 1777), 390 A Dialogue between Britain, France, Spain, Holland, Saxony and America, 394 To Charles de Weissenstein (July 1, 1778), 397 The Ephemera (1778), 402 To Richard Bache (June 2, 1779), 404 Morals of Chess (1779), 406 To Benjamin Vaughan (November 9, 1779), 410 The Whistle (1779), .
Page 106
seems to rest on his elaborate and detailed application to the economic world of the concept of a unified natural order, operating according to natural law, and if left to its own course producing results beneficial to mankind" (p.
Page 125
Visits Cotton Mather and Governor Burnet (New York).
Page 139
New York: 1910, pp.
Page 192
I assur'd him it would, and that he would be the better for it.
Page 300
As to the "Religious Courtship," Part of which has been retal'd to the Publick in these Papers, the Reader may be inform'd, that the whole Book will probably in a little Time be printed and bound up by itself; and those who approve of it, will doubtless be better pleas'd to have it entire, than in this broken interrupted Manner.
Page 355
SIR, I inclose you answers, such as my present hurry of business will permit me to make, to the principal queries contained in yours of the 28th instant, and beg leave to refer you to the latter piece in the printed collection of my papers, for farther explanation of the difference between what are called _electrics per se_, and _non-electrics_.
Page 368
[Gemini] [Taurus] Arms .
Page 405
4 | 5 0 | 8 | 14 | | 26 | 0 43 | 5 49 | 8 | 15 | | 27 | 1 29 | 6 38 | 9 | 16 | | 28 | 2 12 | 7 24 | 10 | 17 | | 29 | 2 47 | 8 10 | 11 | 18 | | 30 | 3 21 | 8 54 | 11 | 19 | | 31 | 3 50 | 9 38 | 12 | 20 | +----+----------+----------+----+------+ of Fire turns once round in about twenty-five Days.
Page 410
[Mercury] _will be_ | | 5 |[Taurus] 19 | [Sextile] [Sun] [Mars] _starv'd,_ | | 6 | 22 | [Venus] sets 10 26 _if_ | | 7 |[Gemini] 6 | [Moon] w.
Page 448
| | --> +----+----------+----------+----+------+ | 1 | A.
Page 453
| 5 16 | 6 44 | | 20 | 2 |Day 13 26 long.
Page 465
| +----+-----------------+---------------------------------------------+ | 1 |[Scorpio] 5 | [Sextile] [Venus] [Mercury] _He that_ | | 2 | 18 | [Sextile] [Mars] [Venus] _builds_ | | 3 |[Sagittarius] 1 | [Venus] rises 1 51 | | 4 | 14 | _before he counts_ | | 5 | 27 | [Moon] with [Saturn] _the_ | | 6 |[Capricorn] 9.
Page 467
| | 16 |[Taurus] 9 | [Mars] rise 9 11 | | 17 | 22 | [Venus] rise 2 14 | | 18 |[Gemini] 5 | [Moon] with [Mars] | | 19 | 18 | Patience _in_| | 20 |[Cancer] 2 | _Market, is_ | | 21 | 16 | _worth Pounds_| | 22 |[Leo] 0 | [Sun] in [Libra] [Quartile] [Sun] [Saturn] | | 23 | 14 | [Moon] w.
Page 551
My dear beloved Jenny, don't delight so much to dwell in those lower rooms, but get as fast as you can into the garret, for in truth the best room in the house is _charity_.
Page 572
Talking in your Sleep shall betray you, in the Delirium of a Fever you yourselves shall make your own Wickedness known.
Page 590
World, and the most amiable.
Page 717
are one hundred thousand families in Paris, and that these families consume in the night half a pound of bougies, or candles, per hour.
Page 723
I am not sure, that in a great State it is capable of a Remedy.
Page 779
Nevins, _The American States During and After the Revolution_, 1775-1789, New York, 1924, 12.