Vie de Benjamin Franklin, écrite par lui-même - Tome II suivie de ses œuvres morales, politiques et littéraires

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 131

votre corps.

FRANKLIN.

Oh! comme vous êtes ennuyeuse!

LA GOUTTE.

Allons donc à notre métier. Il faut vous souvenir que je suis votre
médecin. Tenez.

FRANKLIN.

Oh! oh! quel diable de médecin!

LA GOUTTE.

Vous êtes un ingrat de me dire cela!--N'est-ce pas moi qui, en qualité
de votre médecin, vous ai sauvé de la paralysie, de l'hydropisie, de
l'apoplexie, dont l'une ou l'autre vous auroient tué, il y a long-temps,
si je ne les en avois empêchées.

FRANKLIN.

Je le confesse, et je vous remercie pour ce qui est passé. Mais, de
grâce, quittez-moi pour jamais; car il me semble qu'on aimerait mieux
mourir que d'être guéri si douloureusement.--Souvenez-vous que j'ai
aussi été votre ami. Je n'ai jamais loué de combattre contre vous, ni
les médecins, ni les charlatans d'aucune espèce: si donc vous ne me
quittez pas, vous serez aussi accusable d'ingratitude.

LA GOUTTE.

Je ne pense pas que je vous doive grande obligation de cela. Je me moque
des charlatans. Ils peuvent vous tuer, mais ils ne peuvent pas me nuire;
et quant aux vrais médecins, ils sont enfin convaincus de cette vérité,
que la goutte n'est pas une maladie, mais un véritable remède, et qu'il
ne faut pas guérir un remède.--Revenons à notre affaire. Tenez.

FRANKLIN.

Oh! de grace, quittez-moi; et je vous promets fidèlement que désormais
je ne jouerai plus aux échecs, que je ferai de l'exercice journellement,
et que je vivrai sobrement.

LA GOUTTE.

Je vous connois bien. Vous êtes un beau prometteur: mais après quelques
mois de bonne santé, vous recommencez à aller votre ancien train. Vos
belles promesses seront oubliées comme on oublie les formes des nuages
de la dernière année.--Allons donc, finissons notre compte; après cela
je vous quitterai. Mais soyez assuré que je vous visiterai en temps et
lieu: car c'est pour votre bien; et je suis, vous savez, votre bonne
amie.

[70] Cette pièce, et la suivante, ont été écrites en français par
Franklin; aussi y trouvera-t-on divers anglicismes.




LETTRE À MADAME HELVÉTIUS[71].


Passy, 1781.

Chagriné de votre résolution prononcée si positivement hier au soir, de
rester seule pendant la vie, en l'honneur de votre cher mari, je me
retirai chez moi, et tombé sur mon lit, je me croyois mort et me
trouvois dans les Champs-Élisées.

On m'a

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 3
George Whitefield 110 To Mrs.
Page 17
Poor Dick farther advises, and says, _Fond pride of dress is sure a very curse; Ere fancy you consult, consult your purse.
Page 30
Mathematics originally signified any kind of discipline or learning, but now it is taken for that science which teaches or contemplates whatever is capable of being numbered or measured.
Page 44
In some cases, indeed, certain modes of luxury may be a public evil, in the same manner as it is a private one.
Page 57
The public treasure is the treasure of the nation, to be applied to national purposes.
Page 78
For instance: A gentleman was sued by the executors of a tradesman, on a charge found against him in the deceased's books to the amount of L30.
Page 82
May not one be the deficiency of justice and morality in our national government, manifested in our oppressive conduct to subjects, and unjust wars on our neighbours? View the long-persisted-in, unjust, monopolizing treatment of Ireland, at length acknowledged! View the plundering government exercised by our merchants in the Indies; the confiscating war made upon the American colonies; and, to say nothing of those upon France and Spain, view the late war upon Holland, which was seen by impartial Europe in no other light than that of a war of rapine and pillage; the hopes of an immense and easy prey being its only apparent,.
Page 89
P.
Page 97
I am glad to hear that Peter is at a place where he has full employ.
Page 98
It gives me pleasure to hear that Eben is likely to get into business at his trade.
Page 101
afford a good deal of philosophic and practical knowledge, unembarassed with the dry mathematics used by more exact reasoners, but which is apt to discourage young beginners.
Page 103
You are goodness itself.
Page 115
I only wonder how it happened that they and my other friends in England came to be such good creatures in the midst of so perverse a generation.
Page 127
Our taking the least step towards a treaty with England, through you, might, if you are an enemy, be made use of to ruin us with our new and good friends.
Page 135
At present I do not know of more than two such enemies that I enjoy, viz.
Page 150
_ "Passy, August 19, 1784.
Page 166
Yet, had I gone at seventy, it would have cut off twelve of the most active years of my life, employed, too, in matters of the greatest importance; but whether I have been doing good or mischief is for time to discover.
Page 169
"B.
Page 183
* * * * * _To M.
Page 241
and, consequently, it should seem that the consuming of the coals would rather be checked than augmented by such contraction.