Vie de Benjamin Franklin, écrite par lui-même - Tome II suivie de ses œuvres morales, politiques et littéraires

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 140

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Économie. | | | | | | | |
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Application. | | | | | | | |
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Sincérité. | | | | | | | |
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Justice. | | | | | | | |
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Modération. | | | | | | | |
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Propreté. | | | | | | | |

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Text Comparison with Experiments and Observations on Electricity Made at Philadelphia in America

Page 2
electrical fire is crouded _into the substance_ of the former, the glass confining it.
Page 7
--The light of a bright coal from.
Page 8
But if the persons on wax touch one another during the exciting of the tube, neither of them will appear to be electrised.
Page 10
_&c.
Page 17
A small upright shaft of wood passes at right angles through a thin round board, of about twelve inches diameter, and turns on a sharp point of iron fixed in the lower end, while a strong wire in the upper-end passing thro' a small hole in a thin brass plate, keeps the shaft truly vertical.
Page 20
27.
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3.
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10.
Page 28
Sulphureous and inflammable vapours arising from the earth, are easily kindled by lightning.
Page 30
Thus common matter is a kind of spunge to the electrical fluid.
Page 34
Thus a pin held by the head, and the point presented to an electrified body, will draw off its atmosphere at a foot distance; where if the head were presented instead of the point, no such effect would follow.
Page 37
) big enough to contain a man and an electrical stand.
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24.
Page 39
We once took two pieces of thick looking-glass, as broad as a Gunter's scale, and 6 inches long; and placing leaf gold between them, put them betwixt two smoothly plain'd pieces of wood, and fix'd them tight in a book-binder's small press; yet though they were so closely confined, the force of the electrical shock shivered the glass into many pieces.
Page 43
If the fire that so leaves the bottle be not the same that is thrown in through the wire, it must be fire that subsisted in the bottle, (that is, in the glass of the bottle) before the operation began.
Page 46
Every electrician knows that a globe wet within will afford little or no fire, but the reason has not before been attempted to be given, that I know of.
Page 48
And as the oil of turpentine being an electric _per se_, would not conduct what came up from the floor, was obliged to jump from the end of one chain, to the end of the other, through the substance of that oil, which we could see in large sparks; and so it had a fair opportunity of seizing some of the finest particles of the oil in its passage, and carrying them off with it: but no such effect followed, nor could I perceive the least difference in the smell of the electrical effluvia thus collected, from what it has when collected otherwise; nor does it otherwise affect the body of a person electrised.
Page 49
I have already made this paper too long, for which I must crave pardon, not having now time to make it shorter.
Page 50
electrical fire from the floor to the cushion; then, if there be no fine points or hairy threads sticking out from the cushion, or from the parts of the machine opposite to the cushion, (of which you must be careful) you can get but a few sparks from the prime conductor, which are all the cushion will part with.
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Of Technical Geography and its Branches; Representatory, by Globes and Maps; Synoptical, by Tables; and Explanatory, by Systems and Dictionaries.