Vie de Benjamin Franklin, écrite par lui-même - Tome II suivie de ses œuvres morales, politiques et littéraires

By Benjamin Franklin

Page 5

le lecteur les prononce
souvent mal; et s'appercevant de sa méprise, il est obligé de revenir en
arrière et de recommencer la phrase; ce qui diminue nécessairement le
plaisir des auditeurs. Ceci me rappelle un ancien vice de notre manière
d'imprimer.

L'on sait que quand le lecteur rencontre une question, il doit varier
les inflexions de sa voix. En conséquence, il y a une marque qu'on
appelle _point_ d'interrogation, et qui doit servir à la faire
distinguer. Mais ce point est fort mal placé à la fin de la question.
Aussi le lecteur, qui ne l'apperçoit que quand il a déjà mal prononcé,
est obligé de relire la question. Pour éviter cet inconvénient, les
imprimeurs espagnols, plus judicieux que nous, mettent un point
d'interrogation au commencement, ainsi qu'à la fin des questions.

Nous commettons encore une faute du même genre, dans l'impression des
comédies, où il y a beaucoup de choses marquées pour être dites _à
part_. Mais le mot _à part_ est toujours placé à la fin de ce qui doit
être dit ainsi, au lieu de le précéder, pour indiquer au lecteur qu'il
doit donner à sa voix une inflexion différente.

Souvent cinq ou six de nos dames se réunissent pour faire de petites
parties de travail, où tandis que chacune est occupée de son ouvrage,
une personne de la compagnie leur fait la lecture: certes, un usage si
louable mérite que les écrivains et les imprimeurs cherchent à le rendre
le plus agréable possible au lecteur et à l'auditoire.

Recevez avec les assurances de mon estime, mes voeux pour votre
prospérité.

B. FRANKLIN.

[1] Improved.

[2] Qu'il avoit pris l'_e_ d'employé pour un _i_, l'_l_ pour un _r_ et
l'_y_ pour un _v_. (_Note du Traducteur._)

[3] Au lieu de _donné connoissance de cela_.

[4] De pareilles innovations se sont quelquefois introduites dans
l'assemblée nationale de France; et s'il y en a eu d'heureuses, il y
en a eu aussi de très-ridicules. Cet abus menaçoit même de corrompre
la pureté de notre langue: mais le bon goût en a fait justice.
(_Note du Traducteur._)

[5] Il y a dans l'original _opposer_, qui, en anglais, est le synonyme
de _résister_.

[6] Quand Franklin écrivoit ceci, les Français n'avoient pas encore
l'inappréciable avantage de la liberté de la presse. (_Note du
Traducteur._)

[7] The Gentleman's Magazine.




TABLEAU DU PRINCIPAL TRIBUNAL DE PENSYLVANIE, LE TRIBUNAL

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin; Written by Himself. [Vol. 2 of 2] With his Most Interesting Essays, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings; Familiar, Moral, Political, Economical, and Philosophical, Selected with Care from All His Published Productions, and Comprising Whatever Is Most Entertaining and Valuable to the General Reader

Page 13
How much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep? forgetting that _The.
Page 32
If we can sleep without dreaming, it is well that painful dreams are avoided.
Page 35
3.
Page 39
I found, however, by some broken expressions that I heard now and then, they were disputing warmly on the merit of two foreign musicians, one a _cousin_, the other a _moscheto_; in which dispute they spent their time, seemingly as regardless of the shortness of life as if they had been sure of living a month.
Page 63
One was put to death for inserting in his history the praises of Brutus.
Page 76
The frame and glass of a fine print are to be _cleaned_; the spirit and oil used on this occasion are suffered to leak through and spoil the engraving; no matter, if the glass is clean.
Page 84
We can only lament their fate, and still more that of a sailor, who is often dragged by force from his honest occupation, and compelled to imbrue his hands in perhaps innocent blood.
Page 111
By these early marriages we are blessed with more children; and from the mode among us, founded by nature, of every mother suckling and nursing her own child, more of them are raised.
Page 113
And that it might not be supposed he was for imposing burdens on others that he would not be willing to bear himself, he did at the same time declare his own willingness, if the house should think fit to appoint them, to go over thither _with that honourable gentleman_.
Page 138
I am afraid, therefore, that your affairs may some time or other suffer by my deficiency.
Page 145
B.
Page 155
"But what signifies our wishing? Things happen, after all, as they will happen.
Page 201
The water commonly diffused in our atmosphere never receives such a degree of heat from the sun or other cause as water has when boiling; it is not, therefore, supported by such heat, but.
Page 206
Yet, hoping we may, in time, sift out the truth between us, I will send you my present thoughts, with some observations on your reasons on the accounts in the _Transactions_, and on other relations I have met with.
Page 208
There may be whirlwinds of both kinds, but from the commonly observed effects I suspect the rising one to be the most common: when the upper air descends, it is, perhaps, in a greater body, extending wider, as in our thunder-gusts, and without much whirling; and, when air descends in a spout or whirlwind, I should rather expect it would press the roof of a house _inward_, or force _in_ the tiles, shingles, or thatch, force a boat down into the water, or a piece of timber into the earth, than that it would lift them up and carry them away.
Page 212
It seems easy to conceive how, by this successive condensation from above, the spout appears to drop or descend from the cloud, though the materials of which it is composed are all the while ascending.
Page 214
2 Fig.
Page 232
We knew before that putrid animal substances were converted into sweet vegetables when mixed with the earth.
Page 238
Thus you feel the power of the water to support you, and learn to confide in that power; while your endeavours to overcome it and to reach the egg teach you the manner of acting on the water with your feet and hands, which action is afterward used in swimming to support your head higher above water, or to go forward through it.
Page 246
" * * * * * Transcriber's note: The transcriber made these changes to the text to correct obvious errors: 1.